2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S
CASE REPORT 


              A RARE CASE oF MUllERIAN ANoMAlY– 

            (HEMAToMETRA WITH CERVICAl AGENESIS)

          Srivastava KR1, Rizvi HF2, Katiyar G3 Professor1, Associate Professor2, Junior Resident–II3
              Department of Obst. & Gynae, Era’s Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, 
                           Sarfarazganj, Hardoi Road, Lucknow 226003

ABSTRACT
                                                                          Address for Correspondence
Cervical Agenesis is a relatively infrequent mullerian anomaly. Sixteen years old, unmarried Dr. Kumkum Rani Srivastava
girl presented to ELMC&H Lucknow, with complaints of primary amenorrhoea and cyclical C–102 Indraprasth Estate,
abdominal pain for 1 year. On Per–rectal examination, tense cystic mass was felt on right side, 2–3 Faizabad Road Lucknow.
                                                                            h.No.: +91–9838694477
approximately 5x5 cm in size, tender and freely mobile. Cervix could not be palpated. Small P
knob like structure was felt on left side, 1.5x1.5 cm in size, firm in consistency and freely mobile. 
USG showed uterus of size 5x4x3 cm with collection in endrometrial cavity with? hypoplastic 
cervix suggestive of– Hematometra with cervical agenesis. On laparotomy, tense unicornuate 
uterus on right side and solid rudimentary horn on left side was found, which was attached to 
the uterus by peritoneal fold. Cervix was absent. Both ovaries and tubes were normal. Right 
cornua of uterus was completely excised leaving both the tubes and ovaries.

Key Words : Mullerian Agenesis, Hematometra with Cervical Agenesis.


INTRoD UCTIoNthe probable complications of the same and the need for 

Congenital absence of the cervix is a rare condition and occurs hysterectomy later on. Patient and her attendants opted for 
1 in 80,000 to 100,000 births. It is known to be associated direct hysterectomy because of prolong sufferings of the 
with both partial and complete vaginal aplasia and may be patient. Patient was taken for laparotomy. Per operative 
associated with renal anomalies. According to the American finding were right sided tense unicornuate uterus 5x4x3 cm 
Fertility Society, cervical agenesis is classified as a class IIb with left sided solid rudimentary horn 1.5x1.5 cm, attached 
uterovaginal anomaly. Clinical presentation is usually with to uterus by peritoneal fold and cervix was absent. Both 
primary amenorrhea and cyclical lower abdominal pain, as ovaries and tubes were normal (figure–2). Right cornua of 
was seen in our patient. Endometriosis or pelvic infection uterus was completely excised leaving both the tubes and 
may result from the chronic hematometra by repeated ovaries (figure–3) On cut section – uterus was filled with dark 
manipulations.brown coloured blood around 25cc.(figure–4) Histopathology 
                                                report showed Gross–Uterus(4.5x4x2cm) without cervix and 
CASE REPoRTadnexa. Microscopy–endometrial cavity showing evidence of 

A 16–year–old unmarried girl reported to gynae OPD with haematometra, endometrium was nonsecretory.No cervical 
complaints of primary amenorrhea and cyclical abdominal tissue was found. Post operative period was uneventful.th
pain for 1 year. There was no significant medical or surgical Patient was discharged on 9 post operative day with the 
history. On examination secondary sexual characters advise to come for vaginoplasty three months before marrige.
were well developed. Abdomen was soft, non–tender, no 
organomegaly, On local examination, External genitalia 
was normal and pubic hair well developed. Per vaginal 
examination was not done .On per–rectal examination, tense 
cystic mass was felt on right side, approximately 5x5 cm in 
size, tender and freely mobile. Cervix could not be palpated. 
Small knob like structure was felt on left side, 1.5x1.5 cm 
in size, firm in consistency and freely mobile. All routine 
investigations and IVP were normal. USG showed uterus of 
size 5x4x3 cm with collectionEJMR in endrometrial cavity with 
hypoplastic cervix suggestive of – Hematometra with cervical 
agenesis(figure–1). Examination was done under anesthesia. 
On per vaginum examination, lower 1/4 of vagina was well 
developed,rest of the findings were same. Patient was given  
an option of conservative surgery and counseled regarding Figure1– Ultrasonography 


                                            2627 2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S


                                                DISCUSSIoN

                                                Patients with mullerian agenesis have a normal 46 XX 
                                                karyotype, normal female phenotype, normal ovarian 
                                                function.  Typically, patients with mullerian agenesis present 
                                              in adolescence with primary amenorrhea. Differential 
                                              diagnosis of vaginal agenesis includes androgen insensitivity, 
                                              low lying transverse septum and imperforate hymen. To 
                                              manage vaginal agenesis effectively in young women, correct 
                                              diagnosis of the underlying condition is important. Evaluation 
                                              for associated renal (e.g. renal agenesis, pelvic kidney, duplex 
                                              ureter) and skeletal anomalies are also essential 1, 2

                                                Mullerian abnormalities causing obstruction of blood 
                                                discharge due to cervical or vaginal atresia are rare examples 
                                              of malformation of the female genitalia. In the past, total 
                                                hysterectomy represented a virtually systematic treatment 
                                              of this type of condition. More recently, however, some 
                                                attempts at preserving the uterus of these patients have 
                                              been made in order to preserve their reproductive capacity3. 
        Figure2 – Laprotomy findingThis was achieved by creating a ‘fistula’ between the uterus 

                                              and the vagina or between the uterus and a surgically 
                                                formed neovagina, permitting normal flow between the 
                                                endometrial cavity and the outer environment. These 
                                                conservative techniques lead to relief of the pain due to 
                                              blood accumulation, and provides the psychological benefit 
                                                represented by menstruation and the possibility of maternity. 
                                                Previously the recommended treatment for cervical agenesis 
                                              was a hysterectomy because complications of renalizing the 
                                              cervix were common and the possibility of a viable pregnancy 
                                              was unlikely 4, 5. Recent advances in reproductive technology 
                                              and laparoscopic surgical techniques mean that conservative 
                                                surgery is a possibility and perhaps should be considered 
                                              as the first–line treatment option6. However the results of 

                                         reconstructiveformed cervical surgery body, with are  atbetter least in patients a palpable cord with or a well only  

          Figure 3 – Gross  Specimen  distal obstruction.

                                                CoNClUSIoN

                                              In patients with cervical agenesis, conservative laparoscopic 
                                                surgery should be considered as first–line treatment. This 
                                                surgery should be performed only in a highly specialized unit 
                                              with the required expertise in laparoscopic surgery and in 
                                                management of complex müllerian anomalies. Due to over 
                                              all poor results of reconstruction for congenital absence of 
                                              both the cervix and vagina, clinical experience suggest that 
                                                conservative procedures can be worthwhile for a few carefully 
                                                selected cases with adequate stroma to allow a cervicovaginal 
                                                anastomosis.

                                                REFERENCEEJMR

                                              1. Malewski A.W., Czaplicki M., Kryst P. Congenital 

          Figure 4 – Cut sectionabnormality of urinary tract in Mayer–Rokitansky–
                                                    Kuster–Hauser syndrome (1992). Ginekol Pol. 63:251–
                                                  254.


2627 2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S


2. Sapienza P., Mingoli A., Noia M., Napoli F., Tallerini A. 5. Hampton HL. Role of the gynecologic surgeon in the 
et. al. Mayer–Rokitanski_Kuster–Hauser syndrome. Case management of urogenital anomalies in adolescents. Curr 
report (1992). Minerva Chir. 47:1119–1123.Opin Obstet Gynecol 1990; 2:812– 8.

3. H ampton H.L., Meeks G.R., Bates G.W., Wiser W.L. Pregnancy 6. Grimbizis GF, Tsalikis T, Mikos T, Papadopoulos N, 
after successful vaginoplasty and cervical stenting for partial Tarlatzis BC, Bontis JN. Successful end–to–end cervico–
atresia of the cervix (1990). Obstet Gynecol. 76:900–901cervical anastomosis in a patient with congenital cervical 
                                                    fragmentation: case report. Hum Reprod 2004;19:1204 –10.
4. Rock JA, Schlaff WD, Zacur HA, Jones HW Jr. The clinical 
management of congenital absence of the uterine cervix. Int J 
Gynaecol Obstet 1984;22:231–5.



































            EJMR







                                            2829