2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S
ORIGINAL ARTICLE 


PAIN MANAGEMENT BY WHo STEP lADDER PATTERN PRoToCol

                      IN CASES oF CERVICAl CANCER

                    Namrata3, Singh U2, Srivastava AN1, Singh N2, Shankhwar PL2 

        Professor & Head, Department of Pathology, Era’s Lucknow Medical College & Hospital, Lucknow1
                  Professor, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, KGMU, Lucknow2
                  Senior Resident, Department of Maternal and Reproductive Health,
                  Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow3




ABSTRACT
                                                                          Address for correspondence

To assess pain in cases of cancer cervix and to evaluate the response to pain management  Dr. Namrata 
according to WHO step ladder pattern in cases of cancer cervix, total 209 carcinoma cervix (MBBS)
                                                                                    riveni Nagar III, 
diagnosed and admitted case were recruited in the study. Baseline pain score was measured for MD 538/925 TSitapur Road, Lucknow 
each patient. For mild to moderate pain (VAS ≤ 7) , step 1 analgesic, NSAID, diclofenac sodium Pin – 226020
(50 mg TDS) was prescribed. Pain scores were reevaluated after 48 hrs and change of score was  Phone : 91 9415 118848,
recorded. If pain persisted (same score), worsened (score increased) or score decreased but with  E–mail – dr.nmrata@gmail.com
a VAS score of > 4 , case was considered as non responder and patient was switched to step 2 
analgesic. Step 2 was also applied directly to patients presenting with severe pain ( VAS >7) at 
the time of recruitment. Drugs used in step 2 was oral tramadol (50 mg QID ) along with Diclofenac ( 50 mg TDS) . VAS Score 
was reevaluated after 48 hrs. If score still remained above 4; adjuvant analgesics (Amitryptiline 25–75 mg OD, Prednisolone 5mg 
BD – 10 mg/day) were added to step 2. Step 2 non responders were treated with step3 protocol. In step 3, tab morphine (10 mg 
BD upto maximum 30 mg BD) was given after stopping all other drugs . After 48 hrs, scores were re evaluated; if scores remained 
>4; adjuvant analgesics ( Amitryptiline 25–75 mg OD, Prednisolone 5mg BD – 10 mg/day ) were added. After 48 hrs if still pain 
scores did not decrease to <4, case was declared as failure . The WHO algorithm was followed as per the response of the patients. 
Outcome showed decrease in pain score using Visual Analogue Scale Score. 209 patients were enrolled in the study. 60 patients 
had no pain at baseline. Out of 149 patients with pain, 44.9 % (67) patients achieved complete pain relief at step 1. Out of the 
remaining 82 patients , 5 were lost to follow up. 49.3 % (38) achieved complete relief at step 2 . Only 39 patients did not reach 
score of zero after step 2 but 35 (89.7%) out of them achieved complete relief after step 3. Out of 142 patients ( excluding lost 
to follow up ), 2 cases were declared as failure. Among these failure cases, one of them had metastasis of femur and symphysis 
pubis; bisphosphonates were started. Other patients had bladder and bowel involvement diagnosed on repeat cystoscopy. This 
WHO guideline implementation study supports use of algorithm in decision making for cancer pain management. Following 
the same we were able to achieve effective pain relief in 96% of our patients with failure rate of only 4%. It further helped to 
reduce patient’s agony and improved the quality of life.

Key Words:  Cancer cervix , Pain , Treatment.


INTRoD UCTIoNoccurs from many causes like somatic, visceral, neuropathic 

Pain is a subjective multidimensional experience unique to and bone pain ( Ashby 1992 ) . Ninety percent of pain in 
an individual, with a potential impact on function, status and cancer cervix is a complex resulting from the tumor itself, 
quality of life. Yet it is one of the most common unattended in which 70% of pain develops from tumor invading or 
and unsolved problem for cancer patients. Cancer cervix compressing uterosacral ligament and sacral plexus, and 20% 
is one of the leading cause of cancer death among women of cancer pain is related with its treatment ( radiation and 
worldwide. Incidence of new cancer patients in India is about chemotherapy related neurotoxicity). Rest 10% of pain is due 
100,000 per year and 70% or more of these are stage 3 or to unrelated illness. Common sites of pain in cancer cervix 
higher at the time of diagnosisEJMR (Venugopal T C 1995). Pain are back, lower abdomen, flank, buttocks and perineum. 
is a debilitating symptom associated with cancer cervix. It Pain can be pressure like, dull aching , burning , cramping or 
occurs in 25–50% patients with newly diagnosed malignancy, lancinating (Saphner 1989).
in more than 75% of those with advanced disease, and in WHO recommended a stepladder pattern algorithm as a 
33% of those undergoing treatment (Van den Beuken 2007) . guideline for pharmacological management of cancer pain in 
Pain in patients with cancer cervix is a complex process that 1986 ( WHO 1996 ) which was updated in 1996. It describes 


41



? 2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S


three step progression from the use of nonopoid medication PAIN MANAGEMENT
(acetaminophen, dipyrone, NSAIDs) to weaker opoids 
(codeine, dextropropoxyphene , tramadol) and then strong Oral route was preferred with a fixed schedule dosing to 
opioids ( morphine, methadone, oxycodone, hydromorphone, manage constant pain and prevent pain from worsening. 
buprenorphine ) depending on pain intensity. Using this, Rescue (breakthrough) dose was combined with regular fixed 
pain control can be achieved in 85% of patients. The use of schedule analgesics to control episodic exacerbation. Baseline 
guidelines has been studied in over 30,000 patients, proving pain scores were measured for each patient. For mild to 
its usefulness and efficacy ( Zech 1995 ). However, despite moderate pain (VAS ≤ 7) , step 1 analgesic, NSAID, diclofenac 
the availability of effective guidelines for pain control, most sodium (50 mg TDS) was prescribed. Pain scores were 
cancer patients have a poor quality of life which increases reevaluated after 48 hrs and change of score was recorded. 
their agony. Effective pain management improves quality of If pain persisted (same score), worsened (score increased) 
life as well as the ability to tolerate diagnostic and therapeutic or score decreased but with a VAS score of > 4 , case was 
procedures (Blanchard 1986). Henceforth, this study was considered as non – responder and patient was switched to 
done to assess the need of pain management in cancer cervix step 2 analgesic. Step 2 was also applied directly to patients 
and to evaluate the efficacy of pain management by WHO presenting with severe pain ( VAS >7) at time of recruitment. 
stepladder pattern in the patients of cancer cervix.Drugs used in step 2 was oral Tramadol (50 mg QID ) along 
                                              with Diclofenac ( 50 mg TDS) . VAS Score was reevaluated 
MATERIAlS AND METHoDSafter 48 hrsIf score still remained above 4; adjuvant analgesics 

This pilot prospective cohort study was conducted in the (Amitryptiline 25–75mg OD, Prednisolone 5mg BD – 10 mg/
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, in collaboration day ) were added to step 2. Step 2 non – responders were 
with Department of Anaesthesia, KGMU , over a period of treated with step3 protocol. In step 3, tab Morphine (10 mg 
one year. Total 209 patients were diagnosed as carcinoma BD upto maximum 30 mg BD) was given after stopping all 
cervix, admitted in the Department of Obstetrics and other drugs. After 48 hrs, scores were reevaluated; if scores 
Gynaecology were recruited in the study. These patients were remained >4; adjuvant analgesics (Amitryptiline 25–75 mg 
either receiving or were planned for chemoradiation. Patients OD, Prednisolone 5mg BD – 10 mg/day) were added. After 
with systemic debilitating diseases (renal failure, Diabetes 48 hrs if still pain scores did not decrease to <4, case was 
Mellitus, HIV, respiratory and hepatobilliary diseases), declared as failure as per study protocol and some other 
peptic ulcer, bleeding diathesis , thrombocytopenia, epilepsy palliative measures (neurolytic sympathetic plexus block, 
or history of seizures and patients who underwent major epidural block, epidural neurolysis) was applied to relieve 
surgery within 2 weeks were excluded. Written informed pain. Once the patient’s pain score declined to 0; she was 
consent was taken from each patient before pain assessment followed up to 2 weeks so as to check any increase in pain. 
and management. Demographic details and complete At each step of the ladder, adjuvant drugs (laxatives/stool 
history was recorded. General, systemic and gynaecological softeners ,antiemetic) were considered in selected patients to 
examination was done. Variables recorded were age, parity, treat concurrent symptoms (Mercadante 2001).
presenting complaints, stage of disease, delay in start of STATISTICAl ToolS
treatment, uterosacral ligament involvement, radiotherapy, 
anaemia, smoking/ tobacco, poor family support.Was done using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) 
                                                version 15.0 statistical analysis software
PAIN ASSESSMENT
                                                RESUlT S
Initial pain assessment was done by taking detailed pain 
history regarding pain characteristics like intensity, location, A total 209 patients of carcinoma cervix were enrolled in the 
quality, duration and temporal pattern. Pain intensity was study. The mean age of patients in this study was 49.7 yrs and 
measured by visual analogue scale.VAS is a graduated line maximum patients were in the age group 41–50 years (48%). 
100 mm in length , anchored by word descriptors at each end Majority of the subjects were multiparous (67.5%), residing 
like no pain and worst pain. The patient marks on the line in rural areas (80.3%), of low socioeconomic status (80%) and 
the point that they feel, represents their perception of their illiterate (85%) . Most common presenting symptoms were 
current state. The VAS score is determined by measuring in discharge per vaginum (75%), pain (61%), postmenopausal 
millimeters from the left end of the line to the point that the bleeding ( 44%) , post coital bleeding (15.7%), bladder and 
patient marks. According to VAS score pain was categorized rectal symptoms (10%). Most common type of pain was low 
into mild, moderate and severe categories. Patients with backache (70%) followed by lower abdominal pain (52%) 
mild pain, have VAS scoreEJMR in the range of 1–4, those having and perineal pain (34.6%). Majority of patients had pressure 
moderate pain have VAS score, in the range of 5–6 and like continuous aching pain (74%) with the duration of onset 
patients having severe pain have VAS score ≥ 7. Subsequent of pain being < 6 month in most of the patients. After pain 
assessment was done after giving the drug , at regular intervals assessment of 209 patients, 149 were found eligible for pain 
and at each new report of pain. It was done 24–48 hours after management as per WHO step ladder pattern and their 
oral administration.response was analysed Out of 149 patients with pain, 44.9 % 
                                              (67) patient achieved complete pain relief at step 1. Out of 


                                            23 2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S


the remaining 82 patients , 5 were lost to follow up. 49.3 % and step of pain relief was analysed using chi square test. 
(38) achieved complete relief at step 2 , however 5 patients Uterosacral ligament involvement was associated with 
also required adjuvant medication along with step 2. Only 39 higher step of pain relief (p<0.0001). In 93% of patients 
patients did not reach score of zero after step 2 but 35 (89.7%) with uterosacral involvement, no pain relief was seen at step 
out of them achieved complete relief after step 3. Out of 142 1.Other factors like presence of anaemia, addiction, delay in 
patients (excluding lost to follow up), 2 cases were declared as start of treatment, post radiotherapy, poor family support , 
failure. Among these failure cases, one of them had metastasis old age , illiteracy , low socioeconomic status were studied 
of femur and symphysis pubis; bisphosphonates were started. using logistic regression analysis. These factors did show 
Other patient had bladder and bowel involvement diagnosed an increased risk ratio but were not statistically significant. 
on repeat cystoscopy.Side effects were observed in all analgesic group of patients, 

Association between involvement of uterosacral ligament more commonly with Morphine (30.2%) and Tramadol 

Table 1 : Correlation between stage of the disease and severity of pain

StageNo. PainNo Pain mildModerate Severe

124  7 (29.2%) 17(70.8%)  4 2 1
288 57(64.8%) 31(35.2%)  6 42 9

390 78(86.7%) 12(13.3%)  8 29 41

47 7(100%) 0 ( 0%)  0 0 7

Tot a l209 14960 18 73 58

RESPoNDERS 18  72 57

NoN RESPoNDERS 0 1 1

        2
1. Stage Vs Pain: χ
          =35.850 (df=3); p<0.001

Table 2 : Correlation between initial pain scores and response to step ladder therapy 

  StepVA SNo.RespondersNonlost to  Response to 
                                                        Respondersfollow upadjuvants
11–691 67 (73.6%)24––
2>=758 17(29.3%)41––
2nonresponders of step1 24 16/23 (69.6%) 7/23 (30.4%) 1

2direct + nonresponders of 81 33/81(40.7%) 48/81 (59.3%) ––
      step1

2+adjuvants nonresponders of step 2 48 5 39 45/44(11.4%)

3nonresponders of step 2 39 35 (89.7%)4 (10.3%)–

3+adjuvants nonresponders of step 3 4 22–2/4(50%)

Table 3 : Correlation between stage of disease and response to pain , the proportion of responders decreased from stage 1 
to stage 4 showing a statistically significant inverse

  STAGENUMBER RESPoNDERS  NoNRESPoNDERS
                                                             (including lost to follow up)

 1 7 7 (100%) 0

 2 57 57 (100%) 0

 3 78 75 (96.1%) 3 ( all 3 lost to follow up)

 4 7 3 (42.9%) 4  ( 2 were lost to follow up)

association between stage and response rate ( p< 0.001)

2EJMR
=54.219 (df=3); p<0.001
χ






23 2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S


Table 4 : Correlation between stage of the disease and step of pain relief

STAGESTEP 1STEP 2STEP 3FAIlED
                      ( n= 67)(n = 38) ( n = 37)( n= 2)
1 ( n= 7)6/7 (85.7%) 1 /7 (14.3%) 00
2 (n=57)43/57 ( 75.4%) 14/57 (24.6%) 00
3 (n=75)18/75 (24 %) 23/75 ( 30.7%) 33/75 (44%) 1/75 (1.3%)
4 (n=5)– 0/5 (0%) 4/5 (80%) 1/5 (20 %)

Table 5 : Shows an inverse association between response rate and initial pain category (p<0.001)

INITIAl PAIN SCoRERESPoNDERSNoN RESPoNDERS
 1–4 18 0
5–6 72 1
>=7 52 1 + 5 ( lost to follow up )
                                    2
                                    =6.824 (df=2); p<0.001
                                  χ

Chi square test ‘p’ value = 0.0001

(25%) compared from Diclofenac, constipation was more step 2 the response rate was only 29.3%, showing a statistically 
commonly seen with Morphine (25.6%) compared from significant difference (p<0.001). This indicates that among 
Tramadol (8.5%). Epigastric pain was observed only in patients directly recruited for step 2, the protocol does not 
Diclofenac group (10.9%). Physical dependence, tolerance seem to be a good–fit. Among patients recruited to step 2, 
and addiction was not seen.after failure of step 1, the response rate was 69.6% which was 

DISCUSSIoNat par with the response rate at step 1 (73.6%) (p=0.696). This 
                                                indicates the appropriateness of protocol. Overall response 
Van den Beuken (2007)in a review showed that prevalence among patients recruited to step 2 (both directly recruited 
of pain was 50% in all cancer stages, 64% in patients with and those promoted to step 2 after failure of step 1) was 40.7% 
metastatic or advanced stage disease, 59% in patients on which is significantly lower as compared to that for step 1 
anticancer treatment and 33% in patients after curative (p<0.001). As highlighted above, this difference in response of 
treatment. In the present study, 71.3 % patients had pain two steps was owing to low response rate observed amongst 
as the presenting complaint and majority of the patients directly recruited subjects of Step 2.
(57%) with pain were in advanced stage (3 and 4) followed 
by 38.2 % in stage 2 and 4.6 % in stage 1 of cancer cervix. Response to step 3 (89.7%) was significantly higher as 
Thus, incidence of pain increasing with stage of the disease. compared to both steps 1 and 2, thereby indicating its utility 
Pain evaluation in the present study was done using Visual as the terminal, final step of the protocol. 40.7 % of severe pain 
analogue scale (Wewers 1990). Various other methods of patients responded to Tramadol and 89.7 % of severe pain 
pain measurement are Edmonton symptom assessment patients responded to morphine. Thus, Morphine was found 
(Bruera 1991), Wisconsin Brief pain inventory (Cleeland to be more effective drug in (p<0.001) for severe pain. Gatti 
1994), Memorial pain assessment card (Fishman 1987), A et al (2009) found that with Morphine therapy 30 –60 mg 
McGill pain questionnaire (Melzac 1987), Hopkins pain / day VAS score reduced significantly. They concluded that 
rating instrument (Grossman 1992), Simple descriptive scale Morphine therapy could be implemented as a standard therapy 
(McGrath 1998), Numeric pain distress scale and Facial scale. to manage moderate to severe chronic pain in cancer patients. 
The goal of initial assessment of pain is to characterize the Grond S. etal (1999) compared the efficacy and safety of high 
pathophysiology of pain and to determine the intensity of dose Tramadol and low dose Morphine for mild to moderate 
pain and patients ability to function.cancer pain and observed high dose Tramadol is equally 

Ventafridda V etal (1990), in a study found NSAIDs effectiveMorphine. and Wilder safe Smith for mild  etalto moderate (1994) observed cancer  thatpain  foras low strong dose  
effective and relatively well tolerated in treatment of cancer pain Morphine is more effective than Tramadol.
cancer pain. McNicol E etal (2004) found that nonsteroidal  
anti–inflammatory drugs were preferred for mild to moderate Pain intensity at initial assessment is a significant predictor of 
cancer pain. Pain intensity increases with advancing stage response rate in pain management amongst cancer patients. 
due to involvement of ureters, pelvic wall or sciatic nerve We observed that as the initial VAS score increased, the 
routes. This was confirmedEJMR with findings of this study since response rate decreased (p<0.001). Robin et al (2009) in 
the severity of pain increased (p<0.001) with stage of disease.a study found that pain with moderate to severe intensity 

Radbruch L etal (1996) found that Tramadol is safe and effective required significantly higher opioid doses and more adjuvant 
in the treatment of mild to moderate cancer pain when used in modalities.
combination with non opoids In present study, Step 1 response Guay D R (2001) evaluated the analgesic benefits of tricyclic 
rate was 73.6%. However, among patients directly recruited for antidepressants in cancer patients. Wooldridge J E etal (2001) 


                                            45 2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S


Table 6 : Shows comparison of response at various steps of treatment

Comparison of response to therapy at different stepsP – value
                                                                                2
                                                                                =28.287; p<0.001
Step 1 vs Direct recruited for Step 2χ
                                                                                2
                                                                                =0.153; p=0.696
Step 1 vs Non–respondents of Step 1 given Step 2 therapyχ
                                                                                2
                                                                                =19.043; p<0.001
Step 1 vs Overall Subjects of Step 2 therapyχ
                                                                                2
                                                                                =11.630; p<0.001
Step 2 vs Adjuvants added to step 2χ
                                                                                2
                                                                                =4.196; p=0.041
Step 3 vs Step 1χ
                                                                                2
                                                                                =25.743; p<0.001
Step 3 vs Step 2χ

in a study reported that anti–inflammatory component of REFERENCE
corticosteroid plays role to relieve pain in cancer cervix. The 
response to adjuvants was 11.4% only which was significantly 1. A shby M,  Fleming BG , Brooksbank M etal (1992):Description 
lower compared to that of step 2 (p<0.001), thus indicating of a mechanistic approach to pain management in advanced 
minimal role of adjuvant drugs that this step could be cancer. Preliminary report, 51:153–61.
skipped for the next step. Yet, adjuvant drugs were found to 2. Blanchard CG, Ruckdeschel JC (1986): Psychological aspects 
be valuable for patients who did not respond to step 2 or step of cancer in adults: implication for teaching medical students: 
3 alone, 11.4% in step 2 and 50% in step 3 responded well J Cancer Ed, 1:237–48.
after addition of adjuvant drugs.
                                              3. Bruera E, Kuehn N, Miller MJ etal (1991): The Edmonton 
In the present study, 95.3% patients of cancer cervix symptom assessment system: a simple method for the 
with pain, responded to WHO guided pain management assessment of palliative care patients. J Palliative care, 7: 6–9.
protocol. Grand etal (1993) reported that WHO guided 
pain management protocol provided adequate analgesia in 4. Cleeland C S, Portenoy R K, Rue Met al (2000): Does an oral 
95% of patients with camcer pain. Gayatri Palat etal (1993) analgesic protocol improve pain control for patients with 
in a study reported that pain in cancer cervix patients could cancer? An intergroup study coordinated by the eastern 
be managed effectively in about 80–90% of patients. C S cooperative oncology group. European society for medical 
Cleeland et al (2005), in an inter group study , coordinated by oncology.
Eastern cooperative oncology group, registered 225 patients 5. Cleeland C S, Ryan K M (1994) : Pain assessment: global use of 
of cancer pain. 43% were given milder opiod (codeine) and the Brief Pain Inventory. Ann Acad Med , 23:129–38.
24% received stronger opiod (morphine). they reported 66% 
relief provided by medication. Of 4 non–responders in step 6. Fishman B, Pastenak S, Wallenstein SL etal (1987): The 
3, 2 (50%) showed response on adjuvants while remaining 2 memorial pain assessment card: a valid instrument for the 
(50%) did not respond. This prompts us to look for a better evaluation of cancer pain. Cancer, 60 : 11514–18.
adjuvant therapy in order to get the absolute response at final 7. Gatti A, Reale C etal (2009): Standard therapy with opiods in 
stage of the protocol. Progression of disease stage showed chronic pain management: Ortiber study, 29 suppl : 7–23.
response to higher steps of pain relief in WHO step ladder 
protocol (‘p’ = 0.0001). 75.4 % patients amongst stage 2 were 8. Gayatri Palat, M S Biji, M R Rajagopal etal (2005): Pain 
relieved at step 1 compared to only 24 % of patients amongst management in cancer cervix. Indian journal of palliative care, 
stage 3. 30.7% patients in stage 3 needed step 2 and 44% 2: 64–73.
needed step 3. majority of patients in stage 4 (80%) were 9. Grond S, Radbruch L, Meuser T etal (1999): High dose 
relieved only after step 3.tramadol in comparision to low dose morphine for cancer 
                                                    ain relief. J Pain Symptom Management, 18:174–9.
CoNClU SIoNp
                                                 Grond S, Zech D, Lynch J et al (1993): Validation of the world 
This WHO guideline implementation study supports the 10.health organization guidelines for pain relief in cancer patients. 
use of algorithm for cancer pain management. Effective pain A prospective study. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol, 102:342–8.
relief was achieved in 95.3 % of our patients with minimal side 
effects that could be easily managed. Pain management using 11. Grossman S A, Sheidler V R , Mc Guire D B et al (1992) : A 
WHO algorithm must be an integral part of management of comparision of the Hopkins Pain Rating Instrument with 
cancer cervix patients throughtout the world.standard visual analogue and verbal descriptor scales in 
            EJMRatients with cancer pain. J Pain symptom management, 
ACKNoWlEDGEMENTp7:196–203.

Sincere thanks to Dr. Anita Mallik,  Department of Anaesthesia, 12. Guay D R (2001): Adjunctive agents in the management of 
KGMU.chronic pain . Pharmacotherapy, 21:1070–81.



45 2014 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVol.1 No.1Vol.1Jul.–Dec. 2014ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJul.–Dec. No.1ERA’S


13. M cGrath P A, Doule D, Hanks GWC, MacDonald N : Oxford 20. Van den Beuken, Van Everdingen M H, de Rijke J M, Kessels 
Textbook of Palliative Medicine. 2nd edition . Oxford University A G et al(2007): Prevalence of pain in patients with cancer: a 
Press, pp1013–31.systematic review of past 40 years. Ann Oncol, 18:1437–1449.

14. McNicol E, Strassels S, Goudas L etal (2004): Nonsteroidal 21. Ventafridda V, Conno F D, Panarai A et al(1990): Non 
anti–inflammatory drugs, alone or combined with opiods, for steroidal anti–inflammatory drugs as the first step in cancer 
cancer pain, a systematic review. J Clin Oncol, 22: 1975–1992.pain therapy: double blind, within patient study comparing 
                                                  nine drugs. J Int Med Res, 18: 21–9.
15. Melzac R(1987): The short form Mc Gill pain questionnaire. 
Pain , 30:191–7.22. V enugopal T C, Nandkumar A. , Anantha N(1995) : Incidence , 
                                                    mortality and survival in cancer cervix in Banglore , India. Br 
16. Mercadante S , Portenoy R K (2001): Opioid poorly responsive J Cancer, 71:1348–52.
cancer pain. Part 3. clinical strategies to improve opiod 
responsiveness. J Pain Symptom Manage, 21:338–54.23. Wewers M.E, Lowe N K (1990): a critical review of visual 
                                                    analogue scale in the measurement of clinical phenomena. 
17. Radbruch L, Grond S, Lehmann K (1996): A risk benefit Research in nursing and health, 13 : 227 – 236.
assessment of tramadol in the management of pain. Drug 
safety, 15: 8–29.24. W ilder Smith C, Schimke J, Osteralder B , Senn H(1994): Oral 
                                                    tramadol, a mu– opoid agonist and monoamine reuptake –blocker, 
18. Robin L Fainsinger , Alysa Fairchild , Cheryl Nekolaichuk et and morphine for strong cancer pain. Ann Oncol, 5:141–6.
al (2009): Is pain intensity a predictor of the complexity of 
cancer pain management. Journal of clinical oncology, vol 27, 25. W ooldridge J E, Anderson C M, Perry M C (2001): 
no 4:580–590.Corticosteroids in advanced cancer. Oncology, 15:225–34; 234–6.

19. Saphner T, Gallion H H, Van Nagel J R (1989):.Neurologic 26. W orld health organizationnd (1996): Cancer Pain Relief and 
complications of cervical cancer. A review of 2261 cases. Palliative care, 2 edition Geneva, WHO,
Cancer ,64:1147–51.27. Zech D, Grond S, Lynch J et al (1995): Validation of the World 
                                                    Health Organization Guidelines for cancer pain relief : a 10 
                                                  year prospective study. Pain ,63:65–67.























            EJMR







                                            67