ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVOL.2 NO.1
Original Article


IN–VITRO PROPAGATION OF CHAMOMILLA RECUTITA FROM CAPITULUM 

INFLORESCENCE: A MEDICINAL PLANT WITH MULTIPLE THERAPEUTIC 

                                APPLICATIONS 

                                  Rumana Ahmad 
                              Department of Pathology 
    Era's Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh India– 226003.
                                    Neelam Misra
                    College of Natural and Applied Sciences (CONAS), 
                        Crescent University, Abeokuta, Nigeria


ABSTRACT
A protocol has been developed for induction of somatic embryogenesis 
                                                                Address for correspondence 
from whole inflorescence explants of Chamomilla recutita L. 
(chamomile). Chamomile is a well–known medicinal plant from the 
                                                                Dr. Rumana Ahmad
Asteraceae family often referred to as the “star among medicinal species.” 
                                                                Department of Pathology 
Nowadays, it is a highly favoured medicinal plant in folk and traditional 
                                                            Era's Lucknow Medical College & 
medicine. Its multitherapeutic, cosmetic and nutritional values have been 
                                                                      Hospital,
established through the years of traditional and scientific use and 
                                                                Sarfarazganj, Hardoi Road, 
research. Chamomile has an established domestic (Indian) and 
                                                                  Lucknow–226003, India.
international market, which is increasing day by day. Among the various 
                                                            Email: rumana_ahmad@yahoo.co.in
major constituents, α–bisabolol and chamazulene have been reported to 
be more useful than others. Chamazulene occurs in the capitula of the 
flowers in minute quantities and has been demonstrated to exert anti–
inflammatory activity in–vivo.  Moreover, chamomile is a seasonal 4–5 months winter crop in India but is extensively 
required in various medicinal applications. Therefore, to increase the overall yield of this plant, its in–vitro 
propagation is needed. In the present study, somatic embryos were developed from capitulum explants after 2–4 weeks 
of culture on MS medium supplemented with 26.8 µM NAA and 11.5 µM Kin. The somatic embryos were further 
subcultured in–vitro, where new plantlets regenerated from embryos. It is concluded that in–vitro propagation is 
possible in case of chamomile and can be used to increase the overall yield of chamazulene present in the capitula of 
flowers as well as augment the overall yield of this important plant, which is conventionally propagated by seeds.


Key words: Capitulum, Chamomilla recutita, Inflorescence,  Plant regeneration , Somatic embryogenesis,
Abbreviations: NAA α–napthalene Acetic Acid, Kin Kinetin, MS medium Murashige and Skoog (1962) basal 
medium.

                                            of oil (1). 
INTRODUCTION
 
Chamomilla recutita (synonyms: Matricaria recutita
                                            It was introduced to India during the Mughal period,  
Matricaria chamomilla), commonly known as 
                                            now it is grown in Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra 
chamomile (also spelled camomile), German 
                                            and Jammu & Kashmir. It was introduced in Jammu in 
chamomile, Hungarian chamomile (kamilla), wild 
                                            1957 by Handa et al (2). The plant was first introduced 
chamomile or scented mayweed, is an annual plant 
                                            in alkaline soils of Lucknow in 1964–65 by Chandra et 
belonging to Asteraceae family. Chamomilla recutita is 
                                            al (3,4). There is a great demand for flowers of 
the most popular source of the herbal product 
              EJMR
                                              chamomile (Fig.1). Presently, two firms, namely, M/s 
chamomile, although other species are also used as 
                                            Ranbaxy Labs Limited, New Delhi and M/s German 
chamomile. Chamomile is one of the important 
                                              Remedies are the main growers of chamomile for its 
medicinal herbs native to southern and eastern Europe. 
                                            flowers.
Hungary is the main producer of the plant biomass. In 
Hungary, it also grows abundantly in poor soils and it is a 
                                                    Chamomile has been used in herbal 
source of income to poor inhabitants of these areas. 
                                              remedies for thousands of years and has been 
Flowers are exported to Germany in bulk for distillation 
                                            included in the pharmacopoeia of 26 countries (5). 


                                        1                          ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                              inflammatory and antiseptic, also as an antispasmodic 
                                            and mildly sudorific (13). The other pharmacological 
                                              properties include carminative, healing, sedative and 
                                              spasmolytic activity (14). M. chamomilla has been 
                                              shown to exhibit both positive and negative 
                                              bactericidal activity with Mycobacterium tuberculosis
                                              Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus.


                                            The international demand for chamomile oil has been 

                                              steadily growing. As a result, the plant is widely 

                                              cultivated in Europe and has been introduced in some 

                                              Asian countries for the production of its essential oil. 
                (a)
                                            The oil is used as a mild sedative(15,16) and also for 

                                              digestion(17–19) besides being antibacterial and 

                                              fungicidal in action (20,21). In addition to 

                                              pharmaceutical uses, the oil is extensively used in 

                                              perfumery, cosmetics and aromatherapy,(22–24) and in 
 
                                            food industry (25). Gowda et al (26)found that the 

                                              essential oil present in the flower heads contains 

                                              azulene and is used in perfumery, cosmetic creams, hair 

                                              preparations, skin lotions, tooth pastes, and also in fine 

                                              liquors (26). The dry flowers of chamomile are also in 

                                            great demand for use in herbal tea, baby massage oil, 

                                            for promoting the gastric flow of secretion and for the 

                                              treatment of cough and cold (27).
                (b)

                                              With an ever–increasing global inclination towards 

                                              herbal  medicine, there is not only  an obligatory 

                                              demand for a huge raw material of medicinal plants, but 

                                            also of the right stage when the active principles are 

                                              available in optimum quantities at the requisite time for 

                                              standardization of herbal preparations. Commensurate 

                                            with this, the intervention of biotechnology or to be 

                                              precise, plant tissue culture for accelerating clonal 

                                              multiplication of desired clones and strains (high–

                                              yielding) of medicinal plants through micro 

                                              propagation and their conservation through 

                                              establishing Tissue Banks or Gene Banks are warranted 
                (c)
                                            in the right earnest. Ideally, the herbal plants should be 
Fig: 1 (a) Chamomile recutita Habit (b) Flowers 
              EJMR
                                              grown under uniform environmental conditions and the 
(c) Flower and Leaf Morphology
                                              planting material must have the same genetic make–up 
It is an ingredient of several traditional, Unani and 
                                            as of the selected high–yielding clones, which is 
homeopathy medicinal preparations (6–9). As a drug, it 
                                              possible when they are cloned through an in vitro 
finds use in flatulence, colic, hysteria and intermittent 
                                              strategy, that is, micro propagation, at least in cases 
fever (10). The flowers of M. chamomilla contain the 
                                              where conventional vegetative propagation methods 
blue essential oil from 0.2 to 1.9% (11, 12) which finds a 
                                            are insufficient or wanting to achieve the goal.  In the 
variety of uses. Chamomile is used mainly as an anti–


                                          2IN VITRO PROPAGATION OF CHAMOMILLA RECUTITA FROM CAPITULUM INFLORESCENCE: A MEDICINAL PLANT WITH MUTIPLE 
                                THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS 


                                              Sub–Culturing of Roots, Shoots and Embryos
present study, a protocol has been developed for rapid in–
                                              The jars containing developing embryos were opened 
vitro propagation of Chamomilla recutita.
                                              under aseptic conditions and the embryos taken out 
                                              very carefully using sterilized forceps. Roots and 
MATERIALS AND METHODS
                                              shoots were separated very carefully from the embryos. 
Plant material and disinfection
                                              All three were sub–cultured in separate jars containing 
This research work was carried out in the School of Life 
                                              MS media.
Sciences, ITM University, Gwalior, MP, India. In this 
study, young inflorescences from Chamomile recutita 
                                              RESULTS
were used as explants. All explants were washed under 
                                              After 7–10 days of culturing, some of the cultured 
running tap water for 10 min then surface sterilized in a 
                                              explants (Fig. 2a) showed adaptation to the 
70% ethanol for 60 seconds followed by sodium 
                                              environment while others showed necrosis (browning 
hypochlorite solution (NaCl with 1% active chlorine) for 
                                              of explants) (Fig. 2b). In 15–18 days, early stages of 
10 min. This was followed by 2–3 rinses in distilled water. 
                                              callus formation were observed (Fig. 2c, d). Complete 
                                              callus formation occurred within 4 weeks of culture 
Culture conditions
                                              initiation (Figs.2e,f). The combination of an auxin with 
Immediately after surface sterilization, the explants were 
                                            a cytokinin was more favorable for callus induction 
transferred to laminar airflow cabinet and further 
                                              than addition of only one plant growth regulator. 
                                              Somatic embryogenesis in callus tissue was initiated 
processes were carried out under aseptic conditions. The 
                                              within 30 days of explant culture (Fig. 2g). Embryoids 
explants were carefully transferred to another Petridish 
                                              neither formed nor developed on media not containing 
containing sterilized blotting paper. All petals and sepals 
                                              growth regulators or supplemented only with auxin or 
from the explants were excised with the help of sterilized 
                                              cytokinin. The plumules and radicles were excised 
blades and forceps and the explants were carefully 
                                              from the embryos and sub–cultured separately (Fig. 
inoculated on basal MS medium (Murashige & Skoog, 
                                              2h).  Leaves could be seen arising from the plumule, 
1962) supplemented with 26.8 µM NAA, 11.5 µM Kin, 
                                              roots developing from the radicle. whereas callus 
3% (w/v) sucrose and solidified with 0.7% (w/v) agar. 
                                              forming on embryos within 2 weeks of subculturing 
Sucrose was used as the carbon source and agar as 
                                              (Fig. 2i). 
solidifying agent.  The pH of the medium was adjusted to 
5.8 before autoclaving at 121°C for 15 min and poured 
into 800x800mm glass jars (50 ml medium per jar and 
four explants per jar). Inoculated jars were sealed with 
TM
Parafilmand incubated at 25°C on tissue culture racks 
under controlled light regime (16:8 h light/dark 
photoperiod) supplied by cool–white fluorescent lamps 
and the changes were observed.

Somatic embryo development
After 2–4 weeks in culture all callus tissues (with or 
without somatic embryos at globular stage) were 
transferred to solid media having the same composition 
                                                                    (a)
as the induction medium from which they were removed. 
Culture in jars was maintained for 4–8 weeks at 25°C 
under controlled light regime (16:8 h light/dark 
photoperiod) supplied by cool–white fluorescent lamps.
              EJMR

Somatic embryo maturation and germination
Cotyledonary stage embryos were dissected from callus 
tissues and transferred onto solid induction medium 
where they were maintained for 4–5 weeks at 25°C under 
controlled light regime (16:8 h light/dark photoperiod) 
supplied by cool–white fluorescent lamps.
                                                                    (b)


                                          3                            ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1













                                                                    (g)
                (c)











                                                                    (h)(d)












                                                                    (i)(e)




                                                Fig.2 (a) Sterilized capitula from Chamomile as 
              EJMR
                                                explants. (b) Inoculation of explants on MS 
                                                medium. (c,d)  early. and (e,f) late stages of callus 
                                                formation from cultured explants. (g) somatic 
                                                embryogenesis from transferred callus tissue. 
                                                (h,i) Sub–culturing of excised radicle, plumule 
                                              and embryos


                (f)


                                          4IN VITRO PROPAGATION OF CHAMOMILLA RECUTITA FROM CAPITULUM INFLORESCENCE: A MEDICINAL PLANT WITH MUTIPLE 
                                THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS 


                                              CONCLUSION
DISCUSSION
                                            In the present study, an efficient protocol was developed 
Tissue culture is the culture and maintenance in vitro of 
                                            for rapid micro propagation of chamomile, a winter 
plant cells or organs in sterile, nutritionally and 
                                            crop, from whole capitulum inflorescence. It can be 
environmentally supportive conditions. It has 
applications in research and commerce. In commercial 
                                              concluded from the study that micro propagation can be 
settings, tissue culture is often referred to as micro 
                                            used in chamomile as an alternative to conventional 
propagation, which is really only one form of a set of 
                                              propagation by seeds to increase the yield not only of 
techniques. Micro propagation refers to the production 
                                              chamazulene but the entire herb for various medicinal 
of whole plants from cell cultures derived from 
                                            uses.
explants, the initial piece of tissue put into culture of 
meristem cells. In literature, there are reports on tissue 
                                                ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
culture and micro propagation of chamomile using 
                                            The authors are thankful to the Chancellor and Vice 
various plant parts as explant sources. Stem and leaf 
                                              Chancellor, ITM University, Gwalior, MP, India, for 
explants have been used for the induction of callus 
                                            their support and co–operation in carrying out this study.
cultures; this approach has been taken by Reichling and 
Baker (28) for the establishment of callus cultures from 
                                              CONFLICT OF INTEREST
two chamomile varieties (E40 and BK2) on a modified 
                                            The authors declare that they have no competing 
MS medium supplemented with 2.4 µM NAA (28). 
                                              interests.
 
Reichling et al. (29), isolated a callus culture from 
 
surface–sterilized shoot segments of the chamomile 
                                              REFERENCES
variety BK2 on a modified MS medium supplemented 
                                            1. Svab J. New aspects of cultivating chamomile. 
with NAA (27.7 µM) and Kin (11.9 µM) (29). Somatic 
                                                   Herba Polonica. 1979:25:35–39.
embryogenesis has also been induced from disc florets 
of capitulum inflorescence of chamomile (30). Szoke et 
                                            2. Handa KL, Chopra IC, Abrol BK Introduction of some 
 
al(31, 32) obtained callus tissues from root, stem and 
                                                  of the important exotic aromatic plants in Jammu and 
flower clusters of wild chamomile. They studied the 
                                                  Kashmir.  Indian Perfumer. 1957:1:42–49.
dynamics of growth of callus tissues on the basic growth 
medium containing 2,4–Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 
                                            3. Chandra V.Cultivation of plants for perfumery 
4–D) and Kin in light and dark. It was observed that the 
                                                  industry at Lucknow. Indian Perfumer.1973: 16:40–44
growth of inflorescence callus, either cultured in light or 
dark, was sensitive to added growth regulators. It grew 
                                            4. Chandra V, Singh A, Kapoor LD.Experimental 
better with kinetin + 2, 4–D. Cellarova et al (33) have 
                                                    cultivation of some essential oil bearing plants in 
dealt with the possibility of morphogenesis induction in 
                                                  saline soils, Matricaria chamomilla L. Perfum Essent 
callus tissue cultures of some representatives of M. 
                                                  Oil Rec. 1968:59:871
chamomilla. Shoots in calli have been induced by 0.1 
                                            5. Pamukov D, Achtardziev CH  Natural pharmacy (in 
mg/L Kin or by combination of 0.5 mg/L Kin and 0.5 
                                                          st
mg/L NAA added to Murashige and Skoog medium.  
                                                  Slova). 1ed. Priroda, Bratislava 1986.
Rhizogenesis took place without any other addition of 
                                            6. Das M, Mallavarapu GR, Kumar S. Chamomile,  
auxin. So far, there has been no report of chamomile 
                                                    (Chamomilla recutita): Economic botany, biology, 
micro propagation from the whole capitulum (flower) 
                                                  chemistry, domestication and cultivation. J Med 
head and this study entails an efficient method for in– 
                                                  Aromat Plant Sci. 1998: 20:1074–1079.
vitro propagation of chamomile from the whole 
capitulum inflorescence.
                                            7. Kumar S, Das M, Singh A, Ram G, Mallavarapu GR, 
                                                  Ramesh SJ.  Composition of the essential oils of the 
The multiple uses of medicinal plants in traditional 
systems of medicine such as Ayurveda, Unani, and 
                                                  flowers shoots and roots of two cultivars of 
Siddha have increased their commercial demand 
                                                    Chamomilla recutita. J Med Aromat Plant Sci. 
resulting in their over–exploitation. Because of 
                                                  2001:23: 617–623.
              EJMR
destructive harvesting, the natural populations of a 
                                            8. Lawrence BM. Progress in Essential Oils. Perfume 
number of medicinal plants are rapidly disappearing and 
                                                  Flavorist. 1987:12:35–52.
they are recognized as 'vulnerable'. The development of 
efficient micro propagation protocols for such species 
                                            9. Mann C, Staba EJ  The chemistry, pharmacology and 
would play a significant role in meeting the 
                                                  commercial formulations of chamomile. In: Craker 
requirements for commercial cultivation, thereby 
                                                  LE, Simon JE, eds. Herbs, Spices and Medicinal 
conserving the species in their natural habitat.
                                                  Plants– Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture and 
                                                    Pharmacology.  Oryx Press: Phoenix;  1986.


                                          5                            ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                              identified. CIMAP Newsletter.1993:20: 13.
10. Tyihak E, Sarkany–Kiss J, Verzar–Petri G.  
                                                                  st 
                                            23. Earle L  Vital oils. 1ed., Ebury Press, London.1991.
Phytochemical investigation of apigenin glycosides of 
Matricaria chamomilla. Pharmazie.1962:17:301–304.
                                            24. Masada Y Analysis of essential oils by gas 
                                                                                    st
                                                    chromatography and mass spectrometry. 1 ed., John 
11. Bradley P  The British herbal compendium. In: 
              st
Bradley P, eds. 1 ed., British Herbal Medicine 
                                                  Wiley and Sons Inc., New York.1976.
Association: London;1992.
                                            25. Misra N, Luthra R, Singh KL, Kumar S, Kiran L.  
12. Mann C, Staba EJ  The chemistry, pharmacology and 
                                                  Recent advances in biosynthesis of alkaloids . (In: 
commercial formulations of chamomile. In: Craker 
                                                  Nanishi K, O–Methcohn, eds. Comprehensive) natural 
LE, Simon JE, eds. Herbs, spices and medicinal 
                                                  product (CONAP), Elsevier Publisher, Oxford. pp. 
plants– recent advances in botany, horticulture and 
                                                    2569.1999.
pharmacology. Haworth Press Inc: USA;  2002.
                                            26. Gowda TNV, Farooqi AA, Subbaiah T, Raju B. 
13. Mericli AH. The lipophilic compounds of a Turkish 
                                                  Influence of Plant density, Nitrogen and Phosphorus 
Matricaria chamomilla variety with no chamazuline in 
                                                  on growth, yield and essential oil content of 
the volatile oil. Int J Crude Drug Res. 1990:28:145–
                                                    chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla Linn.) Indian 
147.
                                                    Perfumers.1991:35: 168–72.
14. Salamon I. Chamomile a medicinal plant. J Herbs 
                                            27. Anonymous. Azulene in pharmacy and cosmetics. 
Spices Med Plants. 1992:10:1–4.
                                                    Dragoco Rep. 1969:16: 23–5.
15. Gould L, Reddy CV, Compreht FF. Cardiac effect of 
                                            28. Reichling J, Becker H. Callus  culturen von Matricaria 
chamomile tea. J Clin Pharmacol. 1973:13:475–479. 
                                                    chamomilla. J. Planta Med. 1976:30: 258–268.
16. Das M, Mallavarapu GR, Kumar S. Isolation of a 
                                            29. Reichling J, Bisson W, Becker H. Vergleichende 
genotype bearing fascinated capitula in chamomile 
                                                    Untersuchungen zur Bildung und Akkumulation von 
(Chamomilla recutita) J Med Aromat Plant Sci. 
                                                    etherischem Öl in der intakten Pflanze und in der 
1999:21:17–22.
                                                    Calluskultur von Matricaria chamomilla. Planta Med.  
17. Gasic O, Lukic V, Adamovic R, Durkovic R.  
                                                  1984:56: 334–337.
Variability of content and composition of essential oil 
in various chamomile cultivators (Matricaria 
                                            30. Kintzois S, Michaelakis A Induction of somatic 
chamomillaL.) Herba Hungarica. 1989:28:21–28.
                                                    embryogenesis and in vitro flowering from 
                                                  inflorescences of Chamomile (Chamomilla recutita 
18.  Lal RK, Sharma JR, Misra HO.  Vallary: An improved 
                                                  L.). Plant Cell Reports. 1999:18:684–690.
variety of German chamomile. Pafai J.1996:18: 17–
20.
                                            31.  Szoke E, Verzar–Petri G, Shavarda AL, Kuzovkina IN, 
                                                  Smirnov AM. Differences in the essential oil 
19. Lal RK, Sharma JR, Misra HO, Singh SP.  Induced 
                                                    composition in isolated roots, root callus tissues and 
floral mutants and their productivity in German 
                                                  cell suspensions of Matricaria chamomilla. Izvestiia 
chamomile (Matricaria recutita) Indian J Agric Sci. 
                                                  Akadmii Nauk SSSR–Seriia Biolgicheskaia. 
1993:63: 27–33.
                                                    1980:6:943–949.
20. Shahi NC. Traditional cultivation of Babunah 
                                            32. Szoke E, Kzovkina IN, Verzar–Petri G, Smirnov AM.  
Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert syn. Matricaria 
chamomilla L. Lucknow. Bull Medico–
                                                  Tissue culture of the wild chamomile. Fiziologiya 
Ethnobotanical Res. 1980:1:471477.
                                                  Rastenii (Mosc) 1977:24: 83240.

                                            33. Cellarova E, Grelakova K, Repcak M, Honcariv R.  
21. Sharma A, Kumar A, Virmani OP. Cultivations of 
                                                    Morphogenesis in callus tissue cultures of some 
German chamomile– a review.Curr Res Med Aromat 
                                                    Matricaria and Achillea species. Biol Plant. 
              EJMR
Plants.1983:5: 269–278.
                                                    1982:24:430–436.

22. Anonymous:A superior variety of German chamomile 







                                          6