ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHVOL.2 NO.1
Review Article

                          ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW




                      R.S Bedi, Gauri Pande, Jaipal Singh Patel, 
                          Zeeshan Khan and Nivedita Chauhan
                        Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, 
                Saraswati Dental College & Hospital, Lucknow (UP), India.




ABSTRACT
Oral cancer, undoubtedly, is among the most common malignancies 
                                                                Address for correspondence 
worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 
relatively poor prognosis associated with oral cancer highlights the 
                                                                  Prof. (Dr.) R.S. Bedi 
importance of awareness towards the disease. New research is revealing 
                                                                    Principal & Head
trends that are changing the way we approach its screening, diagnosis and 
                                                          Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, 
treatment. Limited access to cancer care, relative lack of trained 
                                                            Saraswati Dental College & Hospital, 
healthcare providers and financial resources are some of the challenges to 
                                                                  Lucknow (UP), India.
the management of oral cancer in India, despite improvements in 
                                                              Email: kingbedi99@gmail.com
diagnostic techniques and management strategies. The purpose of this 
article is to review the research relevant to this association, including 
epidemiologic studies, diagnostic screening procedures, prevention as well as treatment modalities. 

Key words: Oral Cancer, Prognosis, awareness, epidemiologic, screening, Prevention. 

INTRODUCTION

                                              national cancer registry data show an increasing 
Epidemiology
                                              incidence as per age. However, the incidence among 
Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer globally. 
                                              women is lower than the men. This can be related to 
India has one of the highest incidences of oral cancer and 
                                              differences in lifestyle and behavioural pattern between 
accounts for about 30% of all new cases annually. In 
                                            the two genders. The age group of 55–64 years has the 
India, the gingival–buccal complex (alveolar ridge, 
                                              highest incidence of oral cancer in the USA. In contrast, 
gingival–buccal sulcus, buccal mucosa) forms the most 
 
                                              many patients were <40 years of age in high incidence 
common sub–site for cancer of the oral cavity, in contrast 
                                              countries such as India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka (6). 
to cancer of the tongue that is more common in the 
                                            The incidence of oral cancer is higher in the lower 
western world(1). India has one of the highest incidences 
                                              socio–economic strata of society due to the higher 
of oral cancer (age–standardized rate of 11.0 per 100,000 
                                              prevalence of risk factors such as use of tobacco, 
men and women per year) (2) making it the most 
 
                                              exposure to sunlight, chronic irritation or trauma 
common cancer among men (men:women ratio 2:1) (3). 
                                              (Eduardo et. al.)  and delay  in the treatment for 
Around 90% of the oral cancer cases are diagnosed as 
                                              premalignant lesions. Also the burden of viral causes of 
oral squamous cell carcinoma, therefore oral cancer is 
                                              cancer are quite high. According to International 
also used as a synonym to oral squamous cell carcinoma.
                                              agency for cancer research estimates that one in five 
A recent survey of cancer mortality in India shows cancer 
                                              cancer cases are caused  by  viral  infections. (Patric 
of the oral cavity as the leading cause of mortality in men 
            EJMR
                                              moore et. al.)  The age–standardized mortality rates 
 
and responsible for 22.9% of cancer–related deaths (4).
                                              (India–5.2 per 100 000) have not improved despite 
There is a trend towards increasing incidence and 
                                              improvements in diagnostic and management 
delayed presentation of oral cancer (about 
                                              techniques (7). The overall 5–year survival rate for all 
                                              stages of oral cancer is 60%. These rates are better for 
60% patients present at stage III  or IV) (5). The Indian 
                                              localized tumours (82.8%) as compared to tumours 


                                          22                            ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                              popularity of dried tobacco and areca nut mixtures (pan 
with regional (51.8%) or distant metastases (27.8%).
                                              masala, gutkha, zarda, khaini) especially among the 
Incidence and Trends of Oral Cancer in India
                                              youth, owing to their aggressive marketing in India. 
Oral cancer is a heterogeneous group of cancers arising 
from different parts of the oral cavity, with different 
 
predisposing factors,prevalence and treatment 
 
outcomes.There is a significant difference in the 
 
incidence of oral cancer in thedifferent regions of the 
world, with age–adjusted rates varying from over 20 per 
100,000 population in India, to 10 per 100,000 in the 
U.S.A and less than 2 per 100,000 in the Middle East (8).

In comparison with the U.S. population, where oral 
cavity cancer represents only about 3% of malignancies, 
it accounts for over 30% of all cancers in India. The 
variation in incidence and pattern of oral cancer is due to 
regional differences in the prevalence of risk factors.

Aetiology
Tobacco is the single most important risk factor for oral 
cancer. In comparison to the people who never smoked, 
the relative risk of oral cancer is 5.3 times higher for 
people smoking <15 cigarettes per day, and 14.3 times 
                                                Figure: Lesion on the posterio–buccal surface 
higher for people who smoked >25 cigarettes per day (9). 
                                                      of attached gingiva of mandible
In India the use of smokeless tobacco is rampant in the 
form of betel quid (pan) that contains areca nut and lime 
                                              Alcohol alone confers a 1.7–fold risk to men drinking 
with dried tobacco leaves; this form of tobacco has been 
                                              12 drinks per day as compared to non–drinkers. The 
shown to be highly carcinogenic (10).
                                              consumption of 25, 50 and 100 g/day of pure alcohol 
                                              was associated with a pooled relative risk of 1.75, 2.85 
                                              and 6.01, respectively, of oral and pharyngeal cancer 
                                              (11). Tobacco and alcohol share a synergistic 
                                              relationship, with alcohol promoting the carcinogenic 
                                              effects of tobacco leading to a multifold increase in the 
                                              risk of oral cancer with combined alcohol and tobacco 
                                              exposure. Heavy drinkers and smokers have 38 times 
                                              the risk of oral cancer compared with abstainers (12).


                                              Viral Aetiology
                                              Several viruses are linked with cancer in humans. Our 
                                              growing knowledge of the role of viruses as a cause of 
                                              cancer has led to the development of vaccines to help 
                                              prevent certain human cancers. But these vaccines can 
                                              only protect against infections, if given before the 
  Figure: White lesion on tongue
                                              person is exposed to the cancer–promoting virus.
            EJMR

                                              Human Papilloma Viruses are the leading cause of 
Traditionally, the betel quid is placed in the gingival–
                                              oropharyngeal cancers There are a group of more than 
buccal sulcus and often retained for prolonged durations, 
                                              150 related viruses–. Called papilloma viruses because 
which is responsible for the high prevalence of gingivo–
                                              some of them cause papillomas, which are more 
buccal cancer. Recently, there has  been increasing 


                                          23                                ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW


commonly known as warts. Some types of HPV only 
                                              ·Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) 
                                                    Oral, oropharyngeal and pharyngeal cancer 
grow in skin, while others grow in mucous membranes 
                                                    risk is around twice higher in people with 
such as the mouth, throat, or vagina. All types of HPV are 
                                                      HIV/AIDS, compared with the general 
spread by contact (touch).
                                                      population (13).
The fastest growing segment of the oral and 
oropharyngeal cancer population are otherwise healthy, 
                                              ·Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C 
non–smokers in the 25–50 age range.  In oral cancers, we 
                                                    virus (HCV) 
are primarily concerned with number 16 which is also 
associated with cervical, anal and penile cancers. In the 
                                            Low immunity
oral/oropharyngeal environment, HPV–16 manifests 
                                              Research has established that people have an increased 
itself primarily in the posterior regions such as the base of 
                                              risk of mouth cancer if they are immuno–compromised 
the tongue, the back of the throat, the tonsils, the tonsillar 
                                            such as patients infected with HIV, HBV; etc. 
crypts and tonsillar pillars. 
                                              Medications administered to suppress immunity after 
Two vaccines known as Gardasil and Cervarix protect 
                                              organ transplants also leads to higher risk of mouth 
                                              cancer than in the general population.
against the strains of HPV that cause cervical cancers 
(HPV–16 and 18), Garadsil also protects against two 
                                              Sunlight and Sunbeds
versions that cause genital warts (HPV–6 and 11). The 
                                            Skin cancers such as Basal Cell Carcinoma and 
vaccines can only be used to help prevent HPV infection  
                                              Melanomas are relatively common on the face and neck 
they do not stop or help treat an existing infection (ORAL 
                                              regions, as these areas are often exposed to ultraviolet 
CANCER FOUNDATION) (AMERICAN CANCER 
                                            light (UV). Both the sun and tanning beds give off UV 
SOCIETY ).
                                              rays. These rays can cause skin cancers in unprotected 
                                              skin. Some studies have shown an increase of skin 
                                              cancer in people who regularly use sunbeds. Melanoma 
Epstein–Barr Virus is a type of herpes virus. It is 
                                            is the most serious type of skin cancer and can occur on 
probably best known for causing infectious 
                                            the lips.
mononucleosis, often called “mono” or the “kissing 
                                              Family history and genetics also play an essential 
disease.” In addition to kissing, EBV can be passed from 
                                            role in activation of oncogenes
person to person by coughing, sneezing, or by sharing 
                                              Head and neck cancer risk is 70% higher in people with 
drinking or eating utensils. EBV infection increases a 
                                            a family (particularly sibling) history of head and neck 
person's risk of getting nasopharyngeal cancer (cancer of 
                                              cancer, versus those without such history (14).
the area in the back of the nose) and certain types of fast–
growing lymphomas such as Burkitt lymphoma. It may 
                                              Occupational Hazarads
also be linked to Hodgkin's lymphoma and some cases of 
                                              Formaldehyde and wood–dust are classified by the 
stomach cancer.
                                              International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) 
                                            as causes of nasopharyngeal cancer. Asbestos and 
                                              exposure to printing processes (which may entail 
Other viruses affecting the oropharyngeal region are:
                                              exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 
                                              mineral oils) have been classified by IARC as probable 
·Human herpes virus8 (HHV–8) also known as 
                                              causes of pharynx cancer, based on limited evidence.
Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpes virus 
 
(KSHV), has been found in nearly all tumors in 
 
                                              Oral and pharyngeal cancer risk is 25% higher in 
patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS).
                                              people exposed to asbestos and 14% higher in people 
                                              exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons 
·Human T–lymphotrophic virus–1 (HTLV–1) 
                                              compared with the general population (15).
has been linked with a type of lymphocytic 
            EJMR
leukemia and non–Hodgkin's lymphoma called 
                                              Chronic trauma of the oral mucosa (CTOM) is the 
adult T–cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). It 
                                              result of repeated mechanical irritative action of an 
belongs to class of retroviruses.
                                              intraoral injury agent. Defective teeth (malpositioned 
                                            or with sharp or rough surfaces because of decay or 



                                          24                          ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                            A detailed history and physical examination are critical 
fractures), ill–fitting dentures (sharp or rough surfaces, 
                                              for the comprehensive evaluation of patients with oral 
lack of retention, stability or over extended flanges) 
                                              cancer. In the early stages, oral cancer may have few 
and/or Para functional habits (e.g. oral mucosa biting or 
                                              symptoms which are often ignored. The most common 
sucking, tongue interposition or thrusting), acting 
                                              presentation is a patch or a non–healing ulcer; such 
individually or together, could all be responsible of this 
                                              lesion particularly with a history of tobacco and alcohol 
mechanical irritation.CTOM could generate lesions on a 
                                              consumption and which is persistent for over 6 weeks 
healthy mucosa or intensify previous oral diseases (16).
                                              warrants a thorough investigation. Trismus, especially 
                                            of recent onset, is an indication of infra–temporal fossa 
SCC of the tongue is seen most frequently (27.6%), 
                                              involvement, a sign of relative inoperability. Physical 
followed by cancer of the oropharynx (22.8%), lips 
                                              examination should allow for accurate mapping of the 
(16.5%), floor of the mouth (14%), gingival (9.1%) hard– 
                                              extent of contiguous involvement of surrounding 
palate (4.1%) and buccal mucosa (3.5%) Oral cavity 
                                              structures such as the bone, deep musculature of the 
cancers occur predominantly at sites of potential dental 
                                              tongue, floor of the mouth, patient's functional ability, 
and denture trauma, especially in non–smokers without 
                                              search for synchronous second primary, fixity to 
other risk factors. Recognising teeth irritation as a 
                                              surrounding skin and soft tissue and regional lymph 
potential carcinogen would have an impact on prevention 
                                              node status. This is done on the basis of TNM cancer 
and treatment strategies.
                                              staging given by AJCC.

The mechanism by which CTOM is thought to contribute 
                                              Pathological diagnosis should be confirmed with tissue 
to carcinogenesis is not clearly identified. It has been 
                                              biopsy from the most representative non–necrotic area 
proposed that the wound of the oral mucosa may 
                                            of the lesion. A fine–needle aspiration cytology 
facilitate the absorption of other chemical carcinogens. 
                                              (FNAC) of suspected region/cervical metastases for 
Experimental studies of CTOM in animals together with 
                                              imaging is mandatory for locally advanced disease; CT 
evidence of inflammation related cancers, suggest that 
                                              scan has been shown to be better in demonstrating 
CTOM could work by at least other two mechanisms. 
                                              cortical bone involvement of the jaws and the status of 
One consists in the mitosis increase produced to repair 
                                              cervical lymph nodes. MRI is preferred to assess the 
tissue injury, which put cells at risk of DNA damage by 
                                              extent of involvement of soft tissue, skull base, 
other agents, initiating carcinogenesis. The other 
                                              infratemporal fossa, RT planning and medullary bone 
mechanism possibly involved could be because of the 
                                              involvement. Hence, CT scan is preferred in buccal 
chronic inflammation, which happens in  the site affected 
                                              mucosa cancer while MRI is favoured for tongue 
by CTOM, through release of chemical mediators and/or 
                                              cancer. 
oxidative stress. This could induce genetic and 
epigenetic changes, damage DNA, inhibiting its repair, 
                                            In early stage lesions amenable to trans–oral excision 
altering transcription factors, preventing apoptosis and 
                                              with a clinically node–negative neck, ultrasound with or 
stimulating angiogenesis; therefore, it could contribute 
                                              without FNAC is the initial investigation. Ultrasound is 
in all stages of carcinogenesis.
                                              also preferred for close observation and follow–up of 
                                              the neck in patients who are lymph node negative. The 
DIAGNOSIS AND EVALUATION
                                              role of newer imaging modalities such as SPECT 
The various diagnostic modalities for oral cancer 
                                              (Single positron emission computed tomography ) & 
detection are (17)
                                              PET–CT are being used to improve the information 
·Careful detailed history taking
                                              available from radio isotope imaging of the cancer 
·Visual examination and palpation
                                              patient .(Coleman et.al. 1991) But these modalities  
                                            lack  sufficient evidence in pre treatment  assessment. 
·Toluidine blue (Papanicolone Test)
                                              However, it is useful in assessing post–treatment 
·Excision biopsy and Histopathology
                                              residual/recurrent disease.
·Oral brush biopsy (OralCDx)
·Light–based detection systems
                                              BIOPSY
·Chemiluminescence (ViziLite Plus;  
                                              Oral tissue biopsy is the gold standard diagnostic 
            EJMR
 Microlux/DL, Orascoptic–DK)
                                              procedure, necessary for lesions that cannot be 
·Tissue fluorescence imaging (VELscope)
                                              diagnosed on the basis of the history and clinical 
·Tissue fluorescence spectroscopy
                                              findings alone. A thorough inspection of the oral cavity 
·Biomarkers
                                              should be a part of any complete head and neck 
·DNA–analysis
                                              examination. A 0.5–mm margin should be maintained 
·Laser capture microdissection
                                              between the cut and the representative area to be 


                                          25                                ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW


                                              silicon integrated circuit chip that has revolutionized 
sampled. As a general principle, including tissue 
 
                                              electronics, computers, and communications (20).The 
subjacent to the epithelium and removing a wedge of 
                                              detection of oral dysplastic and cancer cells within the 
manageable size is desirable. Therefore, a minimal depth 
                                            chip utilizes membrane–associated cell proteins that are 
of 3 mm, minimal length of 3–6 mm, and minimal width 
                                              singularly expressed on the cell membranes of 
of 1–2 mm Biopsy is often the definitive procedure that 
                                              dysplastic and cancer cells as well as their unique gene 
provides tissue for microscopic analysis.
                                              transcription profiles.

New advances in oral cancer diagnosis
                                              MICROSCOPY 
Because the scalpel biopsy for diagnosis is invasive and 
                                            It is the technical field of using microscopes to view 
has potential morbidity, it is reserved for evaluating 
                                              objects and areas of objects that cannot be seen with the 
highly suspicious lesions and not for the majority of oral 
                                              naked eye (objects that are not within the resolution 
lesions which are clinically not suspicious. Furthermore, 
                                              range of the normal eye). There are three well–known 
scalpel biopsy has significant interobserver and 
                                              branches of microscopy: optical,electron, and scanning 
intraobserver variability in the histologic diagnosis of 
                                              probe microscopy. Spectral cytopathology (SCP) is a 
dysplasia (with only 56% agreement rate between them) 
 
                                              recently developed technique for diagnostic 
(17).There is an urgent need to devise critical diagnostic 
                                              differentiation of disease in individual exfoliated cells. 
tools for early detection of oral dysplasia and malignancy 
                                              SCP is carried out by collecting information on each 
that are practical, non– invasive and can  be easily 
                                              cell's biochemical composition via an infrared micro 
performed in an out–patient set–up. Diagnostic tests for 
                                              spectral measurement, followed by multivariate data 
early detection include brush biopsy, toluidine blue 
                                              analysis. Deviations from a cell's natural composition 
staining, autofluorescence, salivary proteomics, DNA 
                                              produce specific spectral patterns that are exclusive to 
analysis, biomarkers and spectroscopy.
                                              the cause of the deviation or disease. These unique 
                                              spectral patterns are reproducible and can be identified 
Laser Capture Microdissection 
                                              and employed via multivariate statistical methods to 
Laser capture microdissection (LCM) has made the study 
                                              detect cells compromised at the molecular level by 
of cancer biology more precise and has greatly boosted 
                                              dysplasia, neoplasia, or viral infection (21).
the efforts in defining the molecular basis of malignancy. 
LCM may be also used to detect the biomarkers and 
                                              Saliva–Based Oral Cancer Diagnosis
establish protein fingerprint models for early detection of 
                                              Using saliva for disease diagnostics and health 
oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). LCM combined 
                                              surveillance is a promising modality in the detection of 
with SELDITOF–MS technology and bioinformatics 
                                              cancer, (Cheng et.al. 2014 ). Salivary genomic and 
approaches may not only facilitate the discovery of better 
                                              proteomic biomarkers represent a non–invasive and 
biomarkers but also provide a useful tool for molecular 
                                              easy approach. (Bano et.al.) Extensive research has 
diagnosis (18).
                                              yielded 100 biomarkers reported in literature. (Cheng 
                                              et.al. 2014). However more extensive research is 
DNA–Analysis 
                                              required to find reliable salivary markers as the ones 
DNA image cytometry measures ploidy status to 
                                              reported are less sensitive and specific prognostic 
                                              markers. 
determine the malignant potential of cells. After staining 
with Feulgen dye, the cytological samples are compared 
                                              At present, the diagnosis of OSCC is based on 
with a reference group of cells. A computer–assisted 
                                              comprehensive clinical examination and histological 
analysis has been recently designed to identify deviations 
                                              analysis of suspicious areas, but it may remain 
of cellular DNA content. Genomic instability contributes 
                                              undetected in hidden sites. A new area of strong 
towards cancer development, and abnormal DNA 
                                              research interest is the use of saliva as a diagnostic aid 
content may distinguish the dysplastic lesions that might 
                                              for early detection of OSCC, which has the advantage 
progress to cancer (19).
                                            of being noninvasive, safe and patient compliant. 
                                              Proteins, mRNA, enzymes, and chemicals extorted 
Lab–on–a–Chip 
                                              from saliva have been found at sufficiently distinct 
Broadly, microfluidics technology –also referred to as 
            EJMR
                                              levels between OSCC and control samples to be 
lab–on–a–chip or micro–total–analysis systems (TAS)–is 
                                              considered as potential biomarkers. These biomarkers 
the adaptation, miniaturization, integration, and 
                                            may perhaps be important indicators of physiological 
automation of analytical laboratory procedures into a 
                                            or pathological conditions and provide information for 
single device or “chip.” Microfluidics is often regarded 
                                              the detection of early and differential markers for 
as the chemistry or biotechnology equivalent of the 
                                              disease. They could be a prospect to serve as a widely 


                                          26                          ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                              neck. 
available screening tool that is independent of the 
localization of a lesion for diagnosis. This, being an 
                                              Beta 2–Microglobulin:
added advantage over other detection methods gives 
                                            A definite increase in the level of beta 2– microglobulin 
salivary biomarker screening the potential to categorize 
                                            has been observed in patients with oral submucous 
patients with malignant and potentially malignant 
                                              fibrosis and oral cancer (25).
lesions (22,23).

                                              CD44, CD80, CD105 (ENDOGLIN):
Tumour markers 
                                              Differences in the expression of HA and CD44 among 
With the evolving understanding of the genetics and 
                                              different types of salivary gland tumours has been 
molecular basis of human malignancies, there has been 
                                              noted, but are not correlated with biologic behavior. In 
much interest in determining whether specific molecular 
                                            oral SCC's decreased expression of CD80 may serve as 
changes in different premalignant and malignant 
tumours might guide treatment decisions. Tumour 
                                            a marker for increased tumourigenicity during early 
markers cannot be construed as primary modalities for 
                                              development, and decreased expression of CD44 
the diagnosis of cancer. Their main utility in clinical 
                                              correlated with decreased survival rate.  Increasing 
medicine has been a laboratory test to support the 
                                              evidence suggest that endoglin (CD105) is a new 
diagnosis. Only a few have stood the test of time and 
                                              powerful marker of neovascularization in solid 
proved to have clinical usefulness. New investigative 
                                              malignancies  and positive CD105 vessels in Adenoid 
techniques at the cellular and molecular level show great 
                                              cystic carcinomas increases risk of metastasis (26).
promise at defining potentially malignant lesions but 
further prospective, in depth studies are required to 
determine their practical usefulness.
                                              Cytokeratins:
                                              Monospecific keratin antibodies are useful for 
Potential uses of tumor markers
                                              evaluation of epithelial differentiation changes in oral 
sScreening in general population
                                              dysplasia's and oral SCC. CK19 and CK8 are markers 
sDifferential diagnosis in symptomatic patients
                                            of sequential premalignant changes in head and neck 
sClinical staging of cancer
                                              carcinogenesis. Non–expression of CK5 may be an 
sEstimating tumour volume
                                            early event occurring in tobacco–associated 
                                              pathological changes in the buccal mucosa (27).
sPrognostic indicator for disease progression

sEvaluating the success of treatment

                                              Cathepsin–D:
sDetecting the recurrence of cancer
                                              Cathepsin D is postulated to promote tumour invasion 
sMonitoring responses to therapy
                                            and metastasis. It is a potential independent predictor of 
sRadioimmuno localization of tumour masses
                                              cervical lymph node metastasis in Head and Neck SCC.
sDetermining direction for immunotherapy

                                              SPECTROSCOPY 
Specific tumor markers implicated in oral neoplasms
                                              Optical spectroscopy explores the optical phenomena 
Alpha–1–antichymotrypsin (1–ACT ) & factor XIIIa 
                                              resulting from the interaction of light with biological 
antibodies:
                                              tissue. It may be particularly useful for the analysis of 
                                              differences in–between normal and cancerous tissue 
Study on peripheral giant cell lesions and central giant 
                                              because of major scattering, absorption and 
cell lesions for characteristics of both cell types by 
                                              fluorescence changes which are known to occur during 
evaluating for Alpha–1–Antichymotrypsin (1–ACT ) & 
                                            the development of cancer. Optical spectroscopy has 
Factor XIIIa antibodies (markers specific for 
                                            the potential to detect malignant lesions earlier, before 
histiocyte/macrophage) concluded that giant cell lesions 
                                            they become macroscopically visible, by probing tissue 
of the oral cavity may arise from precursor cells that 
            EJMR
                                              biochemistry and morphology in vivo in real time.
express markers for both macrophages and osteoclasts 
                                              Three optical techniques that are currently utilized in 
(24).
                                            the detection of PMOL and oral malignancies are; 
BCL–2:
                                              Fluorescence, Elastic scattering and Raman 
Bcl–2 has been suggested as a significant prognostic 
                                              spectroscopy. Autofluorescence and 
indicator in early Squamous Cell Carcinoma of head and 


                                          27                                  ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW

                                                                3
                      Table : Broad classification of tumour markers

I. PROLIFERATION MARKERS           Ki–67, PCNA, p27 Kip/gene, DNA polymerase            alpha, 
                                                 p 105, p120, Statin        

II. ONCOGENES               c–erbB–2 gene, ras gene, myc gene, bd–2 gene

III. GROWTH FACTORS AND RECEPTORS                     EGFR (Epidermal growth factor receptor)

    Transforming growth factor B–HCC

   Fibroblast growth factor receptor

   insulin and insulin like growth factor receptor,


IV. TUMOUR SUPPRESSOR GENES  53 Retinoblastoma susceptibility suppressor gene.


V. SEROLOGICAL TUMOUR MARKERS   a.    Markers associated with cell proliferation

      b.    Markers related to cell differentiation:

               (Carcinoembryonic proteins like

               Carcinoembryonic Ag, a–Feto protein )

        c.    Markers related to metastasis:

        d.    Related to other tumour–associated events.

    e.     Related to malignant transformation.

   f.     Inherited mutations.

   g.     Monocional Ab–defined tumour markers
                                          3


                                              STAGING
chemiluminescence have been studied as non–invasive 
                                              Staging of the malignancy enables to device an 
in–vivo tools for the detection of (pre–)malignant tissue 
                                              individualised treatment plan for patients with better 
alterations (17,27).
                                              understanding of prognosis and outcome. The stage of 
                                              cancers of the oral cavity is based on the size of the 
TOMOGRAPHY 
                                              primary tumour along with involvement of surrounding 
Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non–invasive 
                                              structures, cervical lymph node status and distant 
tomographic imaging modality to detect areas of 
                                              metastases (2009 American Joint Committee for 
inflammation, dysplasia and cancer. OCT is a relatively 
                                              Cancer revised cancer stage groupings for oral cavity 
new high–resolution optical technique that permits direct 
                                              SCC) (29).
immediate imaging of the oral epithelium  on the surface
and at depths exceeding 2mm. It has been compared to 
                                              TREATMENT 
ultrasound scanning conceptually. Both ultrasound and 
                                              Surgery and neck dissection
OCT provide real time structural imaging, but unlike 
                                              Surgery is the most common treatment for oral cancer. 
ultrasound, OCT uses light to provide cross–sectional, 
                                              For more advanced tumours surgery is combined with 
high–resolution sub–surface tissue images. Because 
                                              local RT and/or systemic CT (29,30,31). The intent of 
image resolution can be as good as 5 µm, these images 
                                              surgery is to completely remove cancerous tissue,(32) 
provide an excellent indication of the most important 
                                              leaving histologically normal tumour margins while 
sites for surgical biopsy. With the advent of ever faster 
            EJMR
                                              attempting to preserve normal tissue and function 
and higher–resolution OCT systems, this imaging data 
                                              (33,34,35). Surgical techniques vary depending upon 
may well replace the need for biopsies in many situations 
                                              the ease of access and the size of the lesion to be 
in the foreseeable future (28).
                                              excised. Ideally the surgeon can excise smaller tumours 
                                              from within the oral cavity. However, larger tumours 



                                          28                          ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


TABLE 3: TNM staging system for cancers of the lips and oral cavity
Primary tumor (T)
TX Primary tumor cannot be assessed
TO No evidence of primary tumor
Tis Carcinoma in situ
T1 Tumor < 2 cm in greatest dimension
T2 Tumor > 2 cm but < 4 cm in greatest dimension
T3 Tumor > 4 cm in greatest dimension
T4 (lip) Tumor invades through cortical bone, inferior alveolar nerve, floor of mouth, or skin of face, ie, chin or 
  nose'
T4a Moderately advanced local disease'
 (lip) Tumor invades through the cortical bone. Mouth, or Skin of the face (ie. chin or nose) (oral cavity) Tumor 
 invades adjacent structures (eg. through cortical bone [mandible or maxilla] into the deep [extrinsic) muscle 
  of the tongue [geniogiossus, hyoglossus, palatoglossus. and styloglossus], maxillary sinus, or skin of 
the face)
T4b Very advanced local disease
 Tumor involves masticator space, pterygoid plates, or skull base and/or encases internal carotid artery

Regional lymph nodes (N)
NX Regional nodes cannot be assessed
NO No regional lymph node metastasis
N1 Metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, <  3 cm in greatest dimension
N2 Metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, > 3 cm < 6 cm in greatest dimension; or in multiple ipsilateral 
  lymph nodes, none >6 cm in greatest dimension: or in bilateral or contralateral lymph nodes. none >6 
cm in   greatest dimension
N2a Metastasis in a single ipsilateral lymph node, > 3 cm but < 6 cm in greatest dimension
N2b Metastasis in multiple ipsilateral lymph nodes, none > 6 cm in greatest dimension
N2c Metastasis in bilateral or contralateral lymph nodes. none > 6 cm in greatest dimension
N3 Metastasis in a lymph node. >6 cm in greatest dimension

'Superficial erosion alone of bone/tooth socket by gingival primary is not sufficient to classify a Tumor as T4.

Distant metastases (M)

MO No distant metastasis

M1 Distant metastasis

Stage grouping
Stage O  Tis  NO  MO  
Stage I  T1  NO  MO
Stage II  T2  NO  MO
Stage III T3  NO  MO
  T1  N1  MO
  T2  N1  MO
  T3  N1  MO
Stage IVA T4a  NO  MO
  T4a  N1  MO
  T1  N2  MO
  T2  N2  MO
            EJMR
  T3  N2  MO
  T4a  N2  MO
Stage IVB Any T  N3  MO
  T4b  Any N  MO
Stage IVC Any T  Any N  M1


                                        29                                  ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW


TNM  Disease location

Tis  Carcinoma isitu

T1  Invades lamina propria or submucosa

T2  Invades muscularis propria

T3  Invades adventitia

T4  Invades adjacent structures

N1  Regional node metastases

M1  Distant metastases: celiac nodes. (controversial). cervical nodes, 

  other distant sites, Iiver, lung,  adrenal, bone


Stage       TNM        Standard therapy (2)   Other options (2)
    
   O   Tis, NO, MO   Surgery

    I  T1, NO,MO   Surgery

   II  T2–3, NO, MO   Surgery    Chemotherapy plus radiation
  T1–2, N1,MO       +/–Surgery

   III  T3, N1, MO   Surgery for T3 disease  Chemotherapy plus radiation
  T4, any N, MO       +/–Surgery

   IV  Any T,  any N, M1  Stent for dysphagia
      Radiation
                   Chemotherapy 

and those in difficult–to–access sites may require an 
approach from outside the oral cavity and the removal of 
both soft tissue and bone
                       
More advanced oral cancers may involve the lymph 
nodes. Positive and suspicious lymph node involvement 
may require neck dissection. Even when the lymph nodes 
are negative elective neck dissections are sometimes 
undertaken to prevent the risk of metastasis 
(29,31,32,34). The type and level of neck dissection is 
decided on the  basis of the number, size, state and  site 
(same side, opposite side or both sides) of the lymph 
 
nodes involved (29,31,32).





            EJMR



                                              Figure: The levels of lymph nodes in the neck are as 
                                              shown in the picture. 


                                          30                            ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


SLOAN KETTERING CLASSIFICATION OF LYMPH NODES

  
S.No.Type

  
IaSubmental

  
IbSubmandibular

  
IIaUpper Jugular (anterior to XI )

  
IIbUpper Jugular (Posterior to XI )
  
IIIMiddle Jugular
  
IVaLower Jugular (Clavicular )
  
IVbLower Jugular (Sternal )
  

VaPosterior triangle
  

VbPosterior triangle (Transverse cervical)
  

VICentral compartment
 

The neck dissection has been classified as :

CLASSIFICATION TABLE (K. Thomas Robbins ) classification update 2001

Type of neck dissectionStructures that are removed
  

Comprehensive neck  dissection
 
 

                                            All lymph–bearing tissues(level I–V), spinal 
“Classical” radical neck dissection
 
 

                                            accessory nerve
                                                            (cranial nerve [CN] XI) 
 
                                              sternocleidomastoid muscle, and internal

                                            jugular vein
 
                                            Neck dissection with sparing one or more of 
Modified radical neck dissection
 
                                            the above structures
 
Type ICN XI spared

  
Type IICN XI and internal  jugular vein spared

  
Type III(functional neck dissection)All three structures spared(CN XI, internal 

                                            jugular vein, and sternocleidomastoid 
 

                                            muscle)

                                                                                  m:
                                            Removal of lymph–bearingtissue fro
Selective neck dissection
 

LateralLevelsII–IV
  
 
            EJMR
PosterolateralLevels II–V
   
SupraomohyoidLevels I–III
  
From Medina JE, Rebual NM: Neck dissection, in Cummings CW, Fredrickson J, Harker LE, et al (eds): 
  
Otolaryngology: Head and neck Surgery, pp 1649–1672. St. Louis, Mosby Yearbook, 1993

 

                                          31                                ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW















                                                      Figure : Mandibulectomy with 
                                                          Level III neck dissection















                                                  Figure : Reconstruction of the defect with 
  Classification of Maxillectomy
                                                pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC)
 
                                            1. Classical ( alveolar rim resection ) 
Classification of Mandibulectomy 
                                            2. Reverse marginal ( lower border )
I.)
                                            3. Sagittal (lingual/ buccal plate) 
a) Partial                                 
                                            4. Oblique     
b)    Total

                                              Cheek flaps may be required, either from the floor of 
II.)
                                            the mouth upwards to access the mandible (lower cheek 
a) Segemental mandibulectomy
                                            flap) or from below the eye and downwards to approach 
b) Marginal mandibulectomy
                                            the maxilla (upper cheek flap).
Types of marginal mandibulectomy:  Once it was shown 
                                            In recent years, new technology and techniques have 
that periosteal lymphatic paths were not important in the 
            EJMR
                                              minimized the extent and invasiveness of surgery. 
spread of oral cancers, full thickness removal of the 
                                              These efforts to reduce extensive surgery have resulted 
mandible where it was not involved, was not necessary. 
                                            in decreased morbidity, increased function, and an 
So the concept of marginal mandibulectomy, preserving 
                                              overall benefit to the rehabilitation of the patient 
bony continuity was developed. 
                                              (31,32,35,36).
 
The various types of marginal mandibulectomy are 

                                          32                          ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                              treatment of oropharyngeal cancers.
A new development in surgery is the use of 
autofluorescence to improve visualization and to 
                                            The two main types of RT are external beam radiation 
delineate the lateral spread of the tumour (37). Under 
                                              and brachytherapy. Brachytherapy, a form of internal 
direct fluorescence visualization (FV), the oral mucosa is 
                                              radiation, involves the precise surgical placement of a 
exposed to high–energy (blue) light, which excites the 
                                              radioactive insert into the tumour, directly treating the 
normal fluorophores in the cells and tissue, which in turn 
                                              tumour (30). However, it is restricted by the size of the 
emit a lower–energy light (green) back out of the tissue 
                                              field that it can target effectively. Brachytherapy can 
(37). In cancerous tissue, however, the fluorophores are 
                                            also be used in conjunction with external beam 
altered and are no longer fluoresce, making the cancerous 
                                              radiation. External beam radiation is provided as a daily 
tissue appear much darker than normal tissue under FV 
                                              outpatient treatment, over the course of about 6 weeks, 
(37,38).
                                            using a linear accelerator (LINAC) that focuses 
Following the excision of the tumour, reconstructive 
                                              radiation on the tumour site (30). While it is a very 
surgery is required to restore any loss of function and/ or 
                                              effective cancer treatment, it also unfortunately affects 
aesthetics. The location, size, and extent of 
                                            the normal surrounding tissue and the normal tissue 
reconstruction are the main factors that contribute to the 
                                              through which it travels to reach the tumour site. 
choice of graft, as is the need for soft and hard tissue 
                                              External beam radiation is the more common form of 
coverage. Defects in the oral cavity or dentition may also 
                                            RT for the treatment of head and neck cancers.
require prosthetic devices, such as obturators, dentures or 
implants.

                                              TRADITIONAL AND CURRENT 
RADIOTHERAPY
                                                RADIOTHERAPY
                                            In traditional external beam radiation, “shrinking 
There have been significant changes in RT in recent 
                                              fields” are used to deliver different doses to different 
years, from new methods of delivery to variation of 
                                              regions of disease. “Shrinking fields” refer to a 
delivery schedules. To improve treatment outcomes, 
 
                                              technique in which the most sensitive organs are 
preserve tissue, and reduce side effects (33).In general, 
                                              irradiated first and blocked, treating the overlying low–
the intent of RT is to destroy DNA in rapidly dividing 
 
                                              risk organs next with more superficial radiation (30).
cancer cells in a localized region while preserving 
 
                                            The high–risk areas surrounding the tumour, grossly 
adjacent tissue and function.RT as a single, primary 
                                              involved lymph nodes, and the tumour itself are treated 
treatment is not generally used for oral cancer, although it 
                                            last with the highest dose of tolerable radiation. It is 
may be used as a sole method of treatment in cases where 
                                              imperative that areas surrounding the tumours receive a 
the location of the tumour makes it difficult to excise, 
                                              high amount of radiation as they may contain genetic 
such as the oropharynx, or if the patient refuses surgery 
                                              changes that may lead to secondary malignancies. 
(29,30,39). RT alone has a similar 5–year survival rate to 
                                              Depending upon the size and depth of malignancy a full 
surgery for early–stage disease, with a 37% local 
                                              treatment of radiation is divided into smaller amounts 
recurrence rate.  Brachiradiotherapy is preferred over 
                                              known as fractions or doses. Radiation doses vary; 
teleradiotherapy as it minimises the damage to 
                                              generally 1.8 to 2.0 Gray (Gy) are delivered daily, 5 
surrounding tissues.
                                            days a week. Treatment continues over the course of 6 
                                              weeks for a total of 30 fractions, until a maximum of 60 
Radiotherapy although has shown the same success rate 
                                            Gy is provided (29,30). 
in treating oral squamous cell carcinoma but in 
comparison to surgery alone, RT produces milder 
                                              Current approaches to RT include 3–dimensional 
complications and offers better retention of function and 
                                              conformal radiation therapy (3D–CRT), intensity 
aesthetics, and improved quality of life. The use of 
                                              modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric 
surgery and postoperative RT is a common combination 
            EJMR
                                            arc therapy (VMAT) (29,30,39). These techniques have 
in oral cancer treatment, used for large tumours and when 
                                            been developed both to deliver radiation to the tumour 
surgical margins are positive for cancer (29,30). RT is 
                                              more precisely while protecting normal tissues and to 
usually administered after surgery, as surgery following 
                                              allow for flexibility to alter the dose. 3D–CRT delivers 
RT would be hampered by poor healing and an increased 
                                              beams from 3 dimensions versus the traditional 2, while 
risk of infection. RT combined with CT is the preferred 


                                          33                                ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW


                                              and metastasis. CT affects frequently dividing cells, 
IMRT provides even greater control by using beams of 
                                              such as those in the oral cavity, skin, bone marrow, 
different intensities from a variety of dimensions (39). 
                                              alimentary tract, and hair follicles (32,34). Current CT 
VMAT is a further extension of IMRT, delivering a 
                                              techniques have been shown to reduce toxicities, spare 
higher dose faster to the whole tumour volume 
                                              sensitive organs such as the spinal cord, optic nerve, 
simultaneously either in a single arc or series of arcs. Su 
                                              and parotid glands, and decrease treatment time while 
et al. concluded that using IMRT for early–stage 
                                              still maintaining quality and accuracy. Overall, CT 
nasopharyngeal cancer had 5–year localregional control 
                                              offers enhanced local control, improved disease–
rates of about 97%, with similar local recurrence–free and 
                                              specific survival rates and can contribute to an 
distant metastasis–free survival rates. VMAT attained 
                                              enhanced quality of life.
similar results, further reducing treatment time and 
                                              The delivery of CT can be divided into three categories: 
sparing more normal tissue.
                                              induction CT (before surgery), concurrent CRT (in 
                                              conjunction with radiation treatment), and adjuvant CT 
Two more recent advances in RT are altered fractionation 
 
                                              (after surgery and/or radiation). Induction therapy is 
and concurrent systemic chemotherapy.Altered 
                                              used primarily in patients who have advanced stage 
fractionation refers to changes in the dose per fraction, 
                                              disease and nodal involvement, and in patients at the 
the number of fractions delivered per day, and the overall 
                                              greatest risk of recurrence, second primary tumours, 
duration of treatment. Altered fractionation can further 
                                              and metastases. As CT is the initial therapy, it can be 
be divided into hyperfractionation and accelerated 
                                              distributed systemically in blood vessels not yet 
fractionation (30,39). Hyperfractionation provides 
                                              harmed by radiation, with less concern about toxicities, 
smaller doses per treatment but delivers 2 fractions per 
                                              healing, and immunosuppression. Advantages include 
day for the same or longer time period so that a greater 
                                              the ability to measure tumour response, inhibit 
overall dose can be delivered to the tumour. In contrast, 
                                              extracapsular spread, and prevent metastasis early on, 
accelerated fractionation delivers the total dose over a 
                                              resulting in a significant improvement of local regional 
shorter time period, usually with greater doses per 
                                              control and overall survival (43,44).
fraction or multiple doses per day (40). By increasing 
irradiation intensity, accelerated fractionation reduces 
                                              Concurrent CRT, however, has produced more 
the risk of repopulation of cancer cells, which may follow 
                                              effective results than induction CT (44).  By combining 
delays in treatment. In a meta–analysis comparing the 
                                            a chemotherapeutic agent with radiation, the efficacy of 
efficacy of hyperfractionation and accelerated 
                                            RT is increased and results in better tumour control and 
fractionation in late–stage disease, the authors found that    
 
 
                                              survival rates (42).The combination of induction and 
both significantly improved patient survival rates.Both 
                                              concurrent CRT produces even more beneficial effects 
altered fractionation and hyperfractionation had a 
 
                                              (44).Adjuvant CRT is used as a last effort to completely 
slightly higher 5–year survival rate than traditional RT 
                                              eradicate advanced  disease and metastasis.
(41).

                                            In general, the common classes of chemotherapeutic 
Lastly, with the purpose of attaining radiosensitization, 
                                              agents include platinum compounds (cisplatin and 
concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) is the addition of a 
                                              carboplatin); antimetabolites (methotrexate and 5–
chemotherapeutic drug to RT(39,42). These drugs make 
                                              fluorouracil); taxanes (docetaxel); plant alkaloids; 
the target tissue more sensitive to RT than the 
                                              hydroxyurea; anthracyclines; and most recently 
surrounding normal tissue, thereby increasing RT 
                                              taxoids (44).
efficacy.

                                            A combination of 5–fluorouracil, docetaxel, and 
CHEMOTHERAPY AND TARGETED 
                                              cisplatin has been shown to be efficacious in induction 
THERAPIES
            EJMR
                                              therapy, while more commonly the platinum derivative 
In the past, CT was primarily a palliative treatment for 
                                              cisplatin is used for induction therapy alone. Other 
oral cancer. With the discovery of new drugs, CT has 
                                              novel treatments still in development include the use of 
become a significant curative treatment in advanced oral 
                                              targeted therapies. The main agent is Cetuximab, a 
cancer. The purpose of CT is to destroy dividing 
                                              monoclonal antibody that is intended to target the 
abnormal cancer cells rapidly in order to manage spread 


                                          34                            ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (44). The 
                                              ·Prohibiting all advertising and promotional 
                                                    activities by the tobacco industry and conduct a 
EGFR is overexpressed in epithelial cancers such as oral 
                                                    well–funded counter advertising campaign that 
                                                    focuses on cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, and 
                                                  spit tobacco.
 
                                              ·Denying federal health and medical research 
                                                    funding to organizations that accept health 
                                                    research funding from the tobacco industry or its 
                                                    research institutes.

                                              ·Encourage professional sports teams to ban the 
                                                  use and advertisement of tobacco products 
                                                    among team members during practices and 
                                                    games.

                                              ·Adding strong statements to tobacco and alcohol 
Figure : Post Ablative Healing of Sub–mandibular Region
                                                    warning labels about the risk of oral cancer. 
                                                    Ensuring that tobacco warning labels cover 25% 
SCC, and can be enhanced with the addition of RT 
                                                    –30% of the front or back of a product's package 
leading to poor treatment results. Cetuximab inhibits 
                                                  and advertising copy.
EGFR, thereby increasing the efficacy of RT (44).

                                              A. Public Education 
Patients who receive CRT following surgery have better 
                                             Seven major strategies were recommended by 
localregional control and better overall survival rates 
                                             the work group on public education.
than patients who receive only radiation postsurgery. In a 
 
recently updated meta–analysis by Pignon et al., both 
                                              ·Develop and disseminate guidelines and lists of 
                                                    resources to assist communities (e.g., states, 
radiation alone and CRT improved local regional control 
                                                    cities, towns, and members of organizations and 
and reduced mortality (45,46). The combination of 
                                                    institutions) in developing, implementing, and 
cetuximab and radiation, however, was significantly 
                                                    evaluating models for oral cancer education. 
more efficient in patients with advanced stage 
                                                    This effort could include an inventory of 
disease.(47,48).
                                                    available guidelines, literature, processes, and 
                                                    educational models. 
RECENT TRENDS IN PREVENTION OF ORAL 
CANCER
                                            · Develop, implement, and evaluate state wide 
Primary prevention 
                                                    models to educate all relevant groups. These 
Prevention and control of tobacco and alcohol use can be 
                                                    models should be tailored to local needs, 
brought about by:– 
                                                    practical, culturally appropriate, and user 
                                                    friendly and should include the following 
A. National Programs
                                                    content areas: 
·Designating federal funding for a national 
program of oral cancer prevention, early 
                                              o risk factors for oral cancer (e.g., tobacco use, 
detection, and control that includes support for 
                                                    alcohol use, and nutritional deficiencies); 
outcomes assessment and policy–based research.  
Increasing excise taxes on tobacco and alcohol 
                                              o signs and symptoms of oral cancer; 
products to provide targeted funding for oral 
cancer prevention programs. 
                                              o procedures for a thorough oral cancer 
            EJMR
                                                    examination and the ease with which the 
·The production of tobacco and related products as 
                                                    examination can be performed; and 
well as alcohol should be forbiden. Strengthening 
                                                    methods of public advocacy. 
and enforcing laws regarding access to tobacco 
and alcohol.
                                              ·Develop and conduct a national campaign to 
                                                  raise public awareness of oral cancer and its link 


                                          35                                ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW


                                             These recommended strategies would facilitate 
to tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption. The 
                                                    research regarding the etiology, prevention and 
campaign might include a mascot or logo, sports 
                                                    treatment of oral cancer and would translate 
figures or other distinguished persons as 
                                                    research findings into effective public health 
spokespersons, or a national oral cancer 
                                                  action.
awareness week. 
                                              ·Strengthen organizational approaches to 
·Ensure that behavioral and educational research in 
                                                    reducing oral cancer by developing cooperative 
                                                  and collaborative arrangements, funding formal 
oral cancer is included in the budget of 
                                                    centers, and involving commercial firms. The 
organizations that sponsor such research (e.g., the 
                                                    following means are suggested: 
National Institutes of Health, universities, and 
foundations). 
 Consortia of researchers and medical and dental 
                                                    practitioners could share patient sources, 
·Ensure that a national research agenda is 
                                                    standardize clinical protocols, achieve adequate 
developed that includes the following: 
                                                  sample sizes, recruit patients and at–risk persons 
                                                  for research studies, and enhance science 
 Ongoing surveillance to monitor knowledge, 
                                                  transfer; individual practitioners as well as 
opinions, attitudes, and practices of the public, 
                                                    organizations (e.g., alcohol treatment centers) 
especially populations at high risk for oral cancer; 
                                                  that serve populations at risk for oral cancer or its 
                                                    sequelae could be sources of study subjects; 
 Surveys of the knowledge, opinions, attitudes, and 
practices of relevant health–care providers 
 Other formal centers could be established in 
regarding oral cancer; 
                                                    addition to those funded by NIDR and the 
                                                    National Cancer Institute; and 
 Determination of the proficiency of persons who 
have been taught to perform an oral cancer self–
 Commercial firms could use their marketing and 
examination; and 
                                                    distribution systems to enhance science transfer, 
                                                  health promotion, and disease prevention 
 Assessment of the quality (e.g., reading level or 
                                                    activities; in addition, they could join with 
scientific accuracy), quantity, and availability of 
                                                    academic or government groups to fund or 
educational materials directed to the public about 
                                                    otherwise facilitate research(49). 
oral cancer. 

                                              Thus, all primary–care providers must assume more 
B. Professional Knowledge and Practice
                                              responsiblity for counseling patients about behaviors 
·Ensuring that clinicians learn procedures to detect 
                                              that put them at risk for developing this cancer, 
oral cancer that are appropriate to their 
                                              examining patients who are at high risk for developing 
professional practice. 
                                            the disease because of tobacco use or excessive alcohol 
                                              consumption and referring patients to an appropriate 
·Urge all health professionals to routinely assess 
                                              specialist for management of a suspicious oral lesion. 
tobacco and alcohol intake by their patients. 
                                              Comprehensive education of medical and dental 
                                              practitioners in diagnosing and promptly managing 
·Encourage health–care agencies and professionals 
                                            early lesions could facilitate the multidisciplinary 
to recommend that all clinicians who deliver 
                                              collaboration necessary to detect oral cancer in its 
primary health care routinely examine their 
                                              earliest stages. Furthermore, because of the public's lack 
patients for oral cancer. 
                                            of knowlege about the risk factors for oral cancer and 
                                              because this disease can often be detected in its early 
·Develop, promote, and maintain a database of all 
                                              stages , the public awareness of oral cancer (including its 
professional education materials related to oral 
                                              risk factors, signs, and symptoms) must also be 
cancer. 
                                              increased. 
            EJMR
 
·Define, identify, develop, and promote centers of 
                                              Oral cancer occurs in sites that lend themselves to early 
excellence in oral cancer management. 
                                              detection by most primary health–care providers and, to 
                                            a lesser extent, by self–examination. Heightened 
C. Data Collection, Evaluation  and Research
                                              awareness in the general population could help with 



                                          36                          ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                              administer, cause little or no toxicity, cause no long 
early detection of this cancer and could stimulate 
                                            term adverse sequelae, be affordable, and ideally, 
dialogue between patients and their primary health–care 
                                              should have the need to be administered only for a short 
providers about behaviors that may increase the risk for 
                                              time.
developing oral cancer. Recent advances in 
understanding the molecular events involved in 
                                              Promising agents for chemoprevention of oral 
developing cancer might provide the tools needed to 
                                              cancer
design novel preventive, diagnostic, prognostic and 
therapeutic regimens to combat oral cancer. Acquiring 
                                              RETINOID
greater knowledge of the biology, immunology, and 
                                              Mechanism of action of these compounds for 
pathology of the oral mucosa may also help to reduce the 
                                              chemoprevention is not well understood. Studies have 
morbidity and mortality from this disease. 
                                              documented lower β carotene (a precursor of vitamin 
                                            A) serum concentrations in patients who develop 
Some simple clinical practices can be followed in day–to–
                                              cancer of the head and neck, than in patients who do not 
day practice, which encourage the tobacco users to quit 
                                              develop these cancerous tumours. Retinoids can act 
tobacco, like the absence of ash trays and any book of 
                                              through induction of differentiation and can inhibit 
advertisement on any tobacco product in the clinic.The 
                                              proliferation, as well as cause programmed cell death.
other practices are: Using routine questionnaire about the 
use of tobacco; complimenting those who do not use 
                                              βCAROTENE 
tobacco of any kind; encouraging the tobacco users to 
                                            β Carotene is one of several carotenoids in the body and 
stop it; display of suitable educational materials in the 
                                            is a precursor of vitamin A. It is found in leafy green 
waiting room and also distribution of such material to the 
                                              vegetables and yellow and orange fruits and vegetables, 
patients. Regular follow–up examination of precancerous 
                                            and it is also available in tablet form. To some extent it 
and other tobacco–related oral lesions will greatly assist 
                                            is converted to vitamin A in the body and is not 
the people who are using tobacco and intend to quit.
                                              associated with hypervitaminosis A syndrome. Several 
                                              studies have noted lower blood levels of β–carotene in 
SECONDARY PREVENTION
                                              patients who develop aerodigestive tract cancers 
Secondary prevention aims at early detection of cancer of 
                                              compared to patients who do not develop cancer. These 
easily accessible sites and oral cavity. It is also called 
                                              findings led to the hypothesis that β–carotene 
cancer control. The ideal time to detect precancerous 
                                              deficiency may predispose to cancer formation. The 
lesions is when it is small and has not spread. In this 
                                              mechanism of action of β–carotene as a 
context dentists have the prime responsibility in 
                                              chemopreventive agent may involve antioxidant 
detecting cancer by screening the oral cavity which 
                                              mechanisms as well as inhibition of free radical 
should be performed in every new patient and at all 
                                              reactions.
recalls. Screening camps can also be organised from time 
to time to conduct toluidine blue, papani colaou test, 
                                                N–ACETYLCYSTEINE 
exfoliative cytology which is inexpensive easy and can 
                                              N–acetylcysteine is an antioxidant and free–radical 
be employed on a large group of people tool in short span 
                                              scavenger that has shown chemopreventive activity in 
of time. Despite the fact that there are false positive and 
                                            lung and tracheal tumors in animals.
false negative results but in the absence of any other 
better alternative, these still are one of the best screening 
tests available(50). 
                                              NONSTEROIDAL ANTI–INFLAMMATORY 
                                              AGENTS
TERTIARY PREVENTION
                                            In animal studies, nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory 
Tertiary prevention aims at the terminal stages. Over 
                                              agents (NSAIDs) have chemopreventive activity in 
70% of cancers have severe pain and other distressing 
                                              several tissues and have shown activity in tumor 
symptoms in the advanced stages. Pain control and 
                                              inhibition in preclinical head and neck cancer models. 
palliative care are major strategies of tertiary prevention.
                                              Because these compounds may be inhibitors of 
                                              proliferation, they may be useful as chemopreventive 
New ways to prevent oral cancer are being studied in 
            EJMR
                                              agents.
clinical trials

CHEMOPREVENTION
                                              VITAMIN E 
Chemoprevention refers to the administration of an agent 
                                              Epidemiologic studies have noted an inverse 
to prevent a cancer from occurring. The agent can be a 
                                              relationship between serum vitamin E levels and oral 
drug or a natural product. These agents must be easy to 


                                          37                                ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW


                                              cells. The dendritic cells are then injected back into the 
cancer. Its mechanism of action postulated to be as an 
                                              body, where they should induce other immune system 
antioxidant agent.
                                            cells to attack the patient's cancer cells (52).
Interferons 
                                              GENE THERAPY
Interferons have shown additive or synergistic antitumor 
                                            New discoveries about how changes in the DNA of 
effects in combination with retinoids.
                                            cells in the mouth and throat cause these cells to 
                                              become cancerous are being applied to experimental 
Curcumin 
                                              treatments intended to reverse these changes. Gene 
Curcumin is the major component of turmeric, which is 
                                              therapies that interfere with the growth–stimulating 
widely used in curry. Curcumin has inhibited 
                                            effect of certain HPVs are also being developed. 
carcinogen–induced tumorigenesis in an oral cancer 
                                              Another type of gene therapy adds new genes to the 
model and is nontoxic. This is under consideration as a 
                                              cancer cells to make them more susceptible to being 
cancer preventive agent(50,51).
                                            killed by certain drugs. These forms of treatment are 
                                            still in the earliest stages of study, so it will probably be 
What is new in oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer 
                                              several years before we know if any of them are 
research and treatment?
                                              effective (52).
Important research into oral and oropharyngeal cancers 
                                              CONCLUSION
is taking place in many universities hospitals, medical 
                                            For patients suffering from oral cancer our aim 
centers, and other institutions around the country. Each 
                                              should be :–
year, scientists find out more about what causes the 
                                             Disease free existence of the patient 
disease, how to prevent it, and how to improve treatment.
                                             Complete aesthetic functional and  
                                             psychological rehabilitation 
DNA  CHANGES
                                             Post treatment good quality of life as close as  
A great deal of research is being done to learn what DNA 
                                             possible to normal
changes cause the cells of the oral cavity and oropharynx 
to become cancerous. One of the changes often found in 
                                              Advances in the treatment of oral cancer have 
DNA of oral cancer cells is a mutation of the TP53 gene. 
                                              improved outcomes for those diagnosed with the 
The protein produced by this gene (called p53) normally 
                                              disease. These improvements have led to a significant 
works to prevent cells from growing too much and helps 
                                              increase in local regional disease control and overall 
to destroy cells with too much damage for the cells to 
                                              survival rates. This is particularly true for oral cancer 
repair. Changes in the TP53 gene can lead to increased 
                                              diagnosed at an early stage, which is often treated with 
growth of abnormal cells and formation of cancers. Some 
  
                                              surgery or radiation alone(40).
studies suggest that tests to detect these gene changes 
may allow oral and oropharyngeal tumors to be found 
                                            The large group of people who are employed by the 
early. These tests may also be used to better find cancer 
                                              tobacco and alcohol production industries should be 
cells that may have been left behind after the tumor is 
                                              motivated to quit those jobs and get involved with 
removed and to determine which tumors are most likely 
                                              public health care services. Government should come 
to respond to surgery or radiation therapy (52).
                                            up with policies of educating such people as well as 
                                            with skill development programs so that such people 
VACCINES
                                            can be employed and can earn their living through a 
Most people think of vaccines as a way to prevent 
                                              much better source, such as small scale industries like 
infectious diseases such as polio or measles. As 
                                              paper industry, candle making etc. Changing the mind 
mentioned earlier, vaccines against human papilloma 
                                            sets of the people and motivating them towards healthy 
virus (HPV) infection are already being used to help 
                                            life style can help us win, our constant struggle/ battle 
prevent cervical cancer. They may have the added benefit 
                                              against oral cancer.
of preventing some oral cancers as well, although they 
won't help treat the disease.
                                            For late–stage disease requiring CT or a combination of 
            EJMR
                                              surgery and CRT, the results remain promising but are 
However, some vaccines are being studied as a way to 
                                            still in need of improvement. Individual patient factors, 
treat people with cancer by helping their immune system 
                                              tumour features, lymph node involvement, and 
recognize and attack the cancer cells. Many of these 
                                              metastasis have to be taken into account for optimal 
vaccines use dendritic cells (cells of the immune system), 
                                              treatment effectiveness. Comorbidities and both short– 
which are removed from the patient's blood and exposed 
                                            and longterm treatment side effects must also be 
in the lab to something that makes them attack tumor 


                                          38                          ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                                    E, Bidoli E, et al. Smoking and drinking in relation 
examined when creating individual patient therapies 
                                                    to cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and 
(49,50).
                                                    esophagus in northern Italy. Cancer Res,1990:50, 
                                                    (65027).
The purpose of monitoring patients following therapy is 
to a) provide care for the sequelae of treatment side 
                                              10. Jussawalla DJ, Deshpande VA. Evaluation of 
effects; b) to coordinate care between specialists and 
                                                    cancer risk in tobacco chewers and smokers: An 
primary care providers to ensure that both oral and 
                                                    epidemiologic assessment. Cancer 1971 28:24452. 
overall health needs are met; and c) to prevent and 
                                                    (Bagnardi V, Blangiardo M, La Vecchia C, Corrao 
identify recurrence or the development of a second 
                                                    G. A meta–analysis of alcohol drinking and cancer 
primary tumour (51). To provide satisfactory care to this 
                                                    risk. Br J Cancer,(2001):85:17005.
complex group of patients, it is important that dental 
                                              11. Blot WJ, McLaughlin JK, Winn DM, Austin DF, 
hygienist’s understand the various treatment modalities 
                                                      Greenberg RS, Preston–Martin S, et al. , Smoking 
for oral cancer and their possible effects. The patient's 
                                                    and drinking in relation to oral and pharyngeal 
hygiene maintenance schedule will result in the dental 
                                                    cancer. Cancer Res, 1988:48 (32827).
hygienist's being one of the dental health professionals 
who is frequently in contact with the patient. Continued 
                                              12. American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC).  
surveillance is essential in order to reduce the risk of 
                                                    American Joint Committee for Cancer Staging 
secondary oral cancers and assist in improving a patient's 
                                                    Manual. 6th ed. Springer: Chicago, Illinois 2002.
quality of life and overall survival.  
                                              13. Shiels MS, Cole SR, Kirk GD, et al. A meta–analysis 
                                                    of the incidence of non–AIDS cancers in HIV–
Conflict of interest
                                                    infected individuals (link is external). J Acquir 
The authors declare that they have no competing 
                                                    Immune Defic Syndr, 2009:52(5), 611–22
interests.

                                              14. Negri E, Boffetta P, Berthiller J, et al. Family 
REFERENCES 
                                                    history of cancer: pooled analysis in the 
                                                      International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology 
1. Pathak KA, Gupta S, Talole S, Khanna V, Chaturvedi 
                                                    Consortium (link is external). Int J Cancer, 
P, Deshpande MS, et al. Advanced squamous cell 
                                                    2009:124(2), 394–401.
carcinoma of lower gingivobuccal complex: Patterns 
of  spread and failure. Head Neck 2005;27:597602.
                                              15. Paget–Bailly S, Cyr D, Luce D. Occupational 
                                                    exposures to asbestos, polycyclic aromatic 
2. SEER Stat Fact Sheet based on 2008–2012 statistics.
                                                    hydrocarbons and solvents, and cancers of the oral 
3. Sankaranarayanan R, Ramadas K, Thomas G, 
                                                    cavity and pharynx: a quantitative literature review 
Muwonge R, Thara S, Mathew B, et al. Effect of 
                                                    (link is external). Int Arch Occup Environ Health, 
screening on oral cancer mortality in Kerala, India: A 
                                                      2012:85(4), 341–51.
cluster–randomised controlled trial. Lancet 
2005;365:192733.
                                              16. Chronic Trauma As Precipitating Factor Of 
                                                      Squamous Cell Carcinoma Of Tongue 3 Case 
4. Dikshit R, Gupta PC, Ramasundarahettige C, 
                                                    Reports Indian Journal of Dental Sciences, October 
Gajalakshmi V, Aleksandrowicz L, Badwe R, et al.  
                                                    2014:6 (4) 
Cancer mortality in India: A nationally representative 
survey. Lancet,  2012:379, 180716.
                                              17. Ravi Mehrotra and Dwijendra K Gupta. Exciting 
                                                    new advances in oral cancer diagnosis: avenues to 
5. Lingen MW, Kalmar JR, Karrison T, Speight PM.  
                                                    early detection.  Head Neck Oncol, 2011:3( 33).
Critical evaluation of diagnostic aids for the detection 
of oral cancer. Oral Oncol, 2008: 44 (1022).
                                              18. He H, Sun G, Ping F. Laser–capture microdissection 
                                                    and protein extraction for protein fingerprint of 
6. Warnakulasuriya S. Global epidemiology of oral and 
                                                    OSCC and OLK. Artif Cells Blood Substit Immobil 
oropharyngeal cancer. Oral Oncol, 2009:45, 30916.
7. Cancer Research UK. Available at http://www. 
                                                    Biotechnol. 2009:37(5),20813
    cancerresearchuk.org/cancer–info/cancerstats/types 
/oral/uk (accessed on 1 Mar 2013).
                                              19. Handschel J, Oz D, Pomjanski N, Depprich R, 
            EJMR
                                                      Ommerborn MA, Braunstein S, Kübler NR, Meyer 
8. J. Ferlay, H. R. Shin, F. Bray, D. Forman, C.Mathers, 
                                                    U, Böcking A. Additional use of DNA–image 
and D.M. Parkin, “GLOBOCAN, 2003, 2008, 2010 
                                                    cytometry improves the assessment of resection 
cancer Incidence and MortalityWorldwide,” IARC 
                                                    margins. J Oral Pathol Med, 2007:36(8), 4725
Cancer Base 
                                              20. Ziober BL, Mauk MG, Falls EM, Chen Z, Ziober 
9. Franceschi S, Talamini R, Barra S, Barón AE, Negri 
                                                    AF, Bau HH.  Lab–on–a–chip for oral cancer 

                                          39                                ORAL CANCER: A REVIEW


                                                    401.
screening and diagnosis. Head Neck. 2008:30(1), 11121.

                                              33. Logan RM. Advances in understanding of toxicities 
21. Papamarkakis K, Bird B, Bedrossian M, Laver N, 
                                                    of treatment for head and neck cancer. Oral Oncol, 
Wein R Diem M.  Cytopathology by optical methods: 
                                                    2009:45(10), 844–8.dol: 10.1016/J arciloncology .
spectral cytopathology of the oral mucosa. Lab 
Invest. 2010:90(4), 58998.
                                              34. Woolgar JA, Rogers S, West CR, Errington RD, 
                                                    Brown JS, Vaughan ED. Survival and patterns of 
22. Prasad G, McCullough M.Chemokines and cytokines 
                                                      recurrence in 200 oral cancer patients treated by 
as salivary biomarkers for the early diagnosis of oral 
                                                    radical surgery and neck dissection. Oral Oncol, 
cancer. Int J Dent, 2013, 813756. 
                                                    1999:35(3), 257–65.
23. Wu JY, Yi C, Chung HR, Wang DJ, Chang WC, Lee 
                                              35. Sutton DN, Brown JS, Rogers SN, Vaughan ED, 
SY, et al. Potential biomarkers in saliva for oral 
                                                    Woolgar JA. The prognostic implications of the 
squamous cell carcinoma. Oral Oncol,2010:46, 226–
                                                    surgical margin in oral squamous cell carcinoma. 
31.
                                                    Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg, 2003:32(1), 304.
24. Dietz A, Rudat V, Conradt C, Weidauer H, Ho A, 
                                              36. Rogers SN, Brown JS, Woolgar JA, Lowe D, 
Moehler T, Prognostic relevance of serum levels of 
                                                    Magennis P, Shaw RJ, et al. Survival following 
the angiogenic peptide bFGF in advanced carcinoma 
                                                    primary surgery for oral cancer. Oral Oncol, 2009: 
of the head and neck treated by primary 
                                                    45(3), 201–11. dol:10.1016.
radichemotherapy. Head Neck, 2000:22(7), 666–673.

                                              37. Poh CF, MacAulay CE, Zhang L, Rosin MP.  
25. Gandour–Edwards R, Trock B, Donald PJ.  Predictive 
                                                    Tracing the “at–risk” oral mucosa field with 
value of cathepsin–D for cervical lymph node 
                                                    autofluorescence: steps toward clinical impact. 
metastasis in head and neck squamous cell 
                                                    Cancer Prev Res (Phila),2009:2(5), 401–4. 
carcinoma. Head Neck, 1999:(8), 718–722.
                                                    dol:10.1158.
26. Gottschlich S, Folz BJ, Goeroegh T, Lippert BM, 
                                              38. Lane PM, Gilhuly T, Whitehead P, Zeng H, Poh CF, 
Maass JD, Werner JA.  A new prognostic indicator for 
                                                    Ng S, et al. Simple device for the direct visualization 
head and neck cancer p53 serum antibodies? 
                                                    of oral–cavity tissue fluorescence. J Biomed Opt, 
Anticancer Res, 1999:19(4A), 2703–2705.
                                                    2006:11(2), 024006.
27. Ito T, kawabe R, Kurasono Y, Hara M, Kitamura H, 
                                              39. Argiris A, Karamouzis MV, Raben D, Ferris RL.  
Fukita K, Kanisawa M. Expressioin of heat shock 
                                                    Head and neck cancer. Lancet, 2008:371(9625), 
proteins in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue: an 
                                                    1695–709.
immunohistochemical study. J Oral Pathol med,  
1998:27(1), 18–22 
                                              40. Peters ES, Ang KK. The role of altered fractionation 
28. Lee J J, Hung HC, Cheng SJ, Chiang CP, L14 by, 
                                                    in head and neck cancers. Semin Radiat Oncol, 
y4CH, Jeng J. H, Chang HH, Kak & SH. Factors 
                                                    1992:2(3), 180–194.
associated with underdiagnosis from incisional 
biopsy of oral leukoplakic lesions.Oral Surg Oral 
                                              41. Bourhis J, Overgaard J, Audry H, Ang KK, 
Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod, 2007:104(2), 
                                                    Saunders M, Bernier J, et al.  Hyperfractionated or 
217–25 
                                                      accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a 
                                                      meta–analysis. Lancet, 2006:368(9538), 843–54.
29. Deng H, Sambrook PJ, Logan RM. The treatment of 
oral cancer: an overview for dental professionals. 
                                              42. Cooper JS, Pajak TF, Forastiere AA, Jacobs J, 
Aust Dent J, 2011:56(3), 244–52, 341.dol: 10. 1111/J 
                                                      Campbell BH, Saxman SB, et al. Postoperative 
1834–7819.
                                                      concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for 
                                                    high–risk squamous–cell carcinoma of the head and 
30. Haddad R, Annino D, Tishler RB. Multidisciplinary 
                                                    neck. N Engl J Med,  2004:350(19),1937–44.
approach to cancer treatment: focus on head and neck 
cancer. Dent Clin North Am, 2008: 52(1), 117, vii.
                                              43. Mohr C, Bohndorf W, Carstens J, Harle F, 
            EJMR
                                                      Hausamen JE, Hirche H, et al. Preoperative 
31. Haddad RI, Shin DM. Recent advances in head and 
                                                      radiochemotherapy and radical surgery in 
neck cancer. N Engl J Med, 2008:359(11), 1143–54. 
dol: 10.1056/NEJ mra 0707975.
                                                    comparison with radical surgery alone. A 
                                                    prospective, multicentric, randomized DOSAK 
32. Shah JP, Gil Z. Current concepts in management of 
oral cancersurgery. Oral Oncol, 2009:45(4–5), 394–



                                          40                            ERA’S JOURNAL OF MEDICAL RESEARCHJan.–June.2015VOL.2 NO.1


                                                    and relation between cetuximab–induced rash and 
study of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity 
                                                      survival. Lancet Oncol, 2010:11(1), 21–28.
and the oropharynx (a 3–year follow–up). Int J Oral 
Maxillofac Surg, 1994:23(3), 140–8.
                                              48. Bonner JA, Harari PM, Giralt J, Azarnia N, Shin 
                                                    DM, Cohen RB, et al. Radiotherapy plus cetuximab 
44. Pignon JP, le Maitre A, Bourhis J, Group M–NC. 
                                                    for squamous–cell carcinoma of the head and neck. 
Meta–analyses of chemotherapy in head and neck 
                                                    N Engl J Med, 2006:354(6), 567–578.
cancer (MACH–NC): an update. Int J Radiat Oncol 
Biol Phys.2007: 69(2 Suppl), S112–4.
                                              49. Funk GF, Karnell LH, Christensen AJ. Long–term 
                                                      health–related quality of life in survivors of head 
45. Pignon JP, Bourhis J, Domenge C, Designe L.  
                                                    and neck cancer. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck 
Chemotherapy added to locoregional treatment for 
                                                    Surg,2012: 138(2), 123–33.
head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: three meta–
                                              50. Seiwert TY, Salama JK, Vokes EE.The 
analyses of updated individual data.MACH–NC 
                                                      chemoradiation paradigm in head and neck cancer. 
Collaborative Group. Meta–analysis of chemotherapy 
                                                    Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2007:4(3):15671. 
on head and neck cancer. Lancet,2000:355(9208), 
949–955.
                                              51. Committee on Cancer Survivorship: Improving 
                                                    Care Quality of Life, National Cancer Policy Board, 
46. Pignon JP, le Maitre A, Maillard E, Bourhis J, Group 
                                                    Institute of Medicine and National  Research 
M–NC. Metaanalysis of chemotherapy in head and 
                                                    Council. From cancer patient to cancer survivor: 
neck cancer (MACH–NC):  an update on 93 
                                                    lost in transition. Hewitt M, Greenfield S, Stovall E, 
randomised trials and 17,346 patients. Radiother 
                                                    editors. Washington, DC: The National Academies 
Oncol, 2009: 92(1), 4–14.
                                                    Press; 2005.

47. Bonner JA, Harari PM, Giralt J, Cohen RB, Jones 
                                              52. Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer. [Last 
CU, Sur RK, et al.  Radiotherapy plus cetuximab for 
                                                    accessed on 2014 Jul 17]. Available from: 
locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer: 5–
                                                        http://www.cancer.org/cancer/oralcavityandoropha
year survival data from a phase 3 randomised trial, 
                                                          ryngealcancer/detailedguide/oral–cavity–and–





















            EJMR







                                          41